The Cheat Sheet: Fall 2010 Arts Preview

The Cheat Sheet: Fall 2010 Arts Preview
Roll over the photos for a quick look at the arts and culture events our critics are most looking forward to this season.
Theater
  • "Notes from Underground"
  • "Welcome to Arroyo's"
  • "In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play" and "Becky Shaw"
  • "Leap of Faith" and "Randy Newman's Harps and Angels"
  • "The Great Game: Afghanistan"
  • "Angels in America"
  • "Woman on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown"
  • "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark"
Classical Music
  • "Il Postino"
  • Riccardo Muti
  • "Das Rheingold"
  • "Turangalila"
  • Alexei Lubimov
  • Mutter-Bashmet-Harrell Trio
  • William Bolcom's "Prometheus"
  • Esa-Pekka Salonen
Art
  • "Franz Xaver Messerschmidt 1736-1783: From Neoclassicism to Expressionism"
  • "Eva Hesse Spectres 1960"
  • "Olmec: Colossal Masterworks of Ancient"
  • "Abstract Expressionist New York"
  • "Man, Myth, and Sensual Pleasures: Jan Gossart's Renaissance"
  • "Collection Applied Design"
  • "Imagining the Past in France"
  • "Suprasensorial: Experiments in Light, Color, and Space"
Performance
  • Project Bandaloop
  • Mark Morris Dance Group
  • Sankai Juku
  • Tere O'Connor's "Wrought Iron Fog"
  • Angelin Preljocaj
  • Helios Dance Theatre
  • Corella Ballet Castilla y León
  • Ralph Lemon How Can You Stay in the House All Day ...
Architecture
  • "Deborah Aschheim: Nostalgia for the Future"
  • "Architecture and Beauty: A Troubled Relationship"
  • "Small Scale, Big Changes: New Architectures of Social Engagement"
  • "Bruce Goff: A Creative Mind"
  • Crocker Museum Extension
  • "Decolonizing Architecture"
Sept. 24: Notes from Underground
Bill Camp stars in this adaptation of Fyodor Dostoevsky's 1864 novel, largely composed of the musings of a madman, who became one of literature's most memorable antiheroes. Robert Woodruff directs this innovative multimedia production, which provoked favorable buzz last season at Yale Repertory Theatre.

La Jolla Playhouse, 2910 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, $39-$66. -- Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Photo credit: Joan Marcus / La Jolla Playhouse
Sept. 30: Welcome to Arroyo's
Kristoffer Diaz, whose "The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity" was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize this year, is a playwright on the rise. "Welcome to Arroyo's" is actually an earlier play, written by Diaz when he was still a student. When the work had its world premiere in Chicago this last spring, the word was mixed, yet the affirmation of Diaz's talent was virtually unanimous. A hip-hop tale of two siblings with big cultural dreams, told by competing DJ narrators.

The Old Globe, 1363 Old Globe Way, San Diego, $29-$67. -- Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Photo credit: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times
Oct. 1 and 29: "In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play" and "Becky Shaw"
Serious playwriting is the bedrock of South Coast Rep, and this season features two Pulitzer Prize finalists that are as unorthodox as they are wryly wise. Sarah Ruhl's "In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play," which began at Berkeley Rep before eventually reaching Broadway, explores female desire in the workplace and home of a late 19th century doctor specializing in a disorder that has become all the rage — hysteria. Gina Gionfriddo's "Becky Shaw," critically acclaimed when it was done off-Broadway in 2009, is a twisted comedy of modern manners revolving around a problematic romantic encounter.

"In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play" and "Becky Shaw," both at South Coast Repertory, 655 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. $28-$66. -- Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Photo credits: South Coast Repertory
Oct. 22: "The Great Game: Afghanistan"
Everything about Afghanistan seems epic — the turbulent history, the rugged geography and even the contemporary drama that has tried to capture its complicated story. This London import, consisting of 12 short plays by different authors and performed in three parts, spans 150 years to contextualize the current bloody quagmire. The American tour makes its West Coast debut at Berkeley Rep, a theater with an impressive track record of tackling serious subjects on an ambitious scale.

Berkeley Repertory Theatre's Roda Theatre, 2015 Addison St., Berkeley, $17-$73 (marathons of all three shows from $88-$190). -- Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Photo credit: John Haynes / Berkeley Rep
Oct. 3 and Nov. 21: "Leap of Faith" and "Randy Newman's Harps and Angels"
Two world premiere musicals rev up the season at Center Theatre Group. First is "Leap of Faith," based on the 1992 film starring Steve Martin as a sham faith healer. The musical, featuring music by the Oscar-winning composer Alan Menken, comes with a pair of dashing leads, Raúl Esparza and Brooke Shields. Rob Ashford (who staged last season's darkly stunning revival of "Parade" at the Taper) lends his sharp director-choreographer perspective. "Harps and Angels," conceived by Jack Viertel, revolves around classic Randy Newman songs ("I Love L.A." among them) that are united to tell a satirical yarn about growing up in the good ol' USA. Veteran director Jerry Zaks is on board to ensure a heavenly ride.

"Leap of Faith," Ahmanson Theatre at the Music Center, Los Angeles, $20-$95.
"Randy Newman's Harps and Angels," Mark Taper Forum at the Music Center, Los Angeles, $20-$80. -- Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Photo credit: Eric Charbonneau / Disney Enterprises
Oct. 28: "Angels in America"
The Signature Theatre Company is devoting its 20th season to Tony Kushner, offering a retrospective that includes both parts of "Angels in America." Performed in repertory, the production, directed by Michael Greif, marks the first New York revival since Kushner took Broadway by storm in the 1990s. Kushner's epic has once again become one of the hottest theater tickets, proving that there's nothing dated about great theater even when it's born out of topical concerns.

Signature Theatre Company at the Peter Norton Space, $20-$85. -- Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Photo credit: Neilson Barnard / Getty Images
Nov. 4: "Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown"
Lincoln Center Theater is behind this musical adaptation of Pedro Almodóvar's giddy 1988 film, and it's one of the most promising musical prospects of a Broadway fall season that is shaping up to be unusually adventurous, with "Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson" and "The Scottsboro Boys" also in the mix. To help this Spanish farce (featuring a book by Jeffrey Lane and music and lyrics by David Yazbek) take off, director Bartlett Sher has gathered a cast that includes Tony winners Brian Stokes Mitchell, Patti LuPone and Laura Benanti.

Belasco Theater, 111 W. 44th St., New York. $36.50 to $126.50. -- Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Photo credit: Peter Kramer / Getty Images
Dec. 21: "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark"
This long-delayed superhero musical, fueled by music written by Bono and the Edge, finally will open just before Christmas — a good time to start earning back the tens of millions of dollars it has notoriously cost. Julie Taymor, who wrote the book with Glen Berger, directs a production that will need to match the overwhelming success she had with "The Lion King." Fortunately, there's no one better at deploying ingenious special effects in the service of gripping fantasy.

Foxwoods Theatre, 213 W. 42nd St., New York, $67.50-$140. -- Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Photo credit: SPIDER-MAN Turn Off The Dark
Sept. 23-Oct. 16: "Il Postino"
What can follow Los Angeles Opera's acclaimed and exhausting "Ring" cycle? Try Daniel Catán's new opera, based on a Chilean novel by Antonio Skármeta that inspired the film "Il Postino" and starring Plácido Domingo as beloved poet Pablo Neruda.

Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave. Various times and dates. $20-$270. 213-972-0777. -- Mark Swed, Music Critic
Photo credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times
Nov. 9: Mutter-Bashmet-Harrell Trio
Following in the footsteps of such celebrity instrumentalists as Jascha Heifetz, Gregor Piatigorsky and Arthur Rubinstein (who formed what was dubbed the Million Dollar Trio) or, later, the Istomin-Stern-Rose trio, German violinist Anne Sophie Mutter, Russian violist Yuri Bashmet and American cellist Lynn Harrell have now gone into the piano trio business. Beethoven will be their calling card for their first local appearance together, in Costa Mesa.

Renée and Henry Segerstrom Hall, 615 Towne Center Drive, Costa Mesa. 8 p.m. $30-$250. -- Mark Swed, Music Critic
Photo credit: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times
Nov. 15: Alexei Lubimov
Monday Evening Concerts begins its new season with a recital by the Russian pianist who had recorded Mozart sonatas on forte piano, plays Schubert and Chopin exquisitely on the modern grand, is a master of Ives' "Concord" Sonata, is the favorite of many a Russian modernist composer and one of Russia's first and best John Cage pianists. Lubimov's program will, of course, be all over the map (and centuries).

Zipper Concert Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave. 8 p.m. $12-$27. (213) 260-1632. -- Mark Swed, Music Critic
Photo credit: Francois Sechet
Oct. 14-17: "Turangalila"
The second week of his second season as music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Gustavo Dudamel, who never needs encouragement to strive for ecstatic heights, will climb the Everest of symphonic ecstasy with Messiaen's "Turangalila" Symphony, an incomparable evening-long erotic ode to mysticism written in 1950 and including the alluringly space-age whine of the electronic keyboard instrument, the ondes martinot.

Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave. 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. $52-$55. (323) 850-2000. -- Mark Swed, Music Critic
Photo credit: Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times
Nov. 18-20: William Bolcom's "Prometheus"
Carl St.Clair and his Pacific Symphony have done particularly well by Bolcom, one of America's most eclectic composers. They've mounted a festival to his work and commissioned him to write a major piece for Plácido Domingo and orchestra celebrating the 2006 opening of the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Hall. Now Pacific Symphony has asked Bolcom for a companion piece to Beethoven's Choral Fantasy, with the same forces of piano, chorus and orchestra. Pianist Jeffrey Beigel will be the soloist in both.

Renée and Henry Segerstrom Hall, 615 Towne Center Drive, Costa Mesa. 8 p.m. $25-$185. (714) 755-5799. -- Mark Swed, Music Critic
Photo credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times
Nov. 19-21: Esa-Pekka Salonen
The Los Angeles Philharmonic's conductor laureate returns to his old orchestra for the first time since Gustavo Dudamel took over last season. Salonen's program is big, bold and newsworthy with the U.S. premiere of a major recent orchestral score by Magnus Lindberg and a concert performance of Bartók's opera "Bluebeard's Castle," featuring mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter and baritone Willard White.

Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave. 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. $52-$55. (323) 850-2000. -- Mark Swed, Music Critic
Photo credit: Ringo H.W. Chiu / For The Times
Sept. 23-28: Riccardo Muti
Long courted by the New York Philharmonic, the Italian maestro from Naples settled on another second city: Chicago. He begins his ballyhooed music directorship with a "Berlioz Spectacular" of "Symphonie Fantastique" and "Lélio" (featuring Gérard Depardieu as narrator). A week later, Christoph Eschenbach starts his first season as music director of the National Symphony in Washington, D.C. with another B: Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

Symphony Center, 220 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago. 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat., 7:30 p.m. Tue. $23-$249. (800) 223-7114. -- Mark Swed, Music Critic
Photo credit: Hans Punz / Associated Press
Sept. 27-Oct. 9: "Das Rheingold"
The Metropolitan Opera's new production of Wagner's "Ring" by Canadian director Robert Lepage is supposed to feature dazzling technology. How well that works remains to be seen, but the cast of the opening opera of tetraology, which also opens the Met's season, is headed by Bryn Terfel as Wotan and leaves little doubt of the ambition of this cycle. James Levine, his health willing, conducts.

Metropolitan Opera, Lincoln Center, New York. Various dates and times. $85-$1,400, opening night. (212) 362-6000 or -- Mark Swed, Music Critic
Photo credit: Ken Howard / Metropolitan Opera
Sept. 25 to Jan. 2 'Eva Hesse Spectres 1960'
"New Images of Man," an exhibition of recent Expressionist figure painting and sculpture that strayed far from the abstract art then dominant in New York, wasn't well received when it opened at the Museum of Modern Art in 1959. But the tension between figurative and abstract work was widely felt, including in the paintings and drawings of a young, German-born college student named Eva Hesse, who was torn between the conflicting proscriptions of her Yale teachers, Josef Albers and Rico Lebrun.

This small show (19 works) of sometimes small (9 by 12 inches) and sometimes easel-size paintings should give a fuller accounting of a transitional body of work by an influential artist who soon brought painting-ideas into the abstract sculptures for which she is so widely admired today.

UCLA Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd. L.A. Admission $7. (310) 443-7000 or -- Christopher Knight, Art Critic
Photo credit: The Estate of Eva Hesse / Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth.
Nov. 16 to Feb. 6 'Imagining the Past in France, 1250-1500'
Manuscript illuminations from the Middle Ages are one of the profound glories of the J. Paul Getty Museum's permanent collection. Building on that in-house strength, a major international loan show with manuscript paintings, carved ivories, woven tapestries and metalwork borrowed from more than 25 museums and libraries will look at the role history played as a subject in the art of the medieval French court. Expect great storytelling — adventures of Alexander the Great, King David's biblical epic and more — mixed with a powerful function as social and political propaganda.

J. Paul Getty Museum, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles. Admission free, but parking is $15. (310) 440-7300 or -- Christopher Knight, Art Critic
Photo credit: J. Paul Getty Trust
Oct. 5 to Jan. 17 ‘Man, Myth, and Sensual Pleasures: Jan Gossart's Renaissance'
Flemish painter Jan Gossart (about 1478-1532) can be tough to like, given his work's peculiar fusion of crystalline, Northern European figures placed in Italianate architectural settings and classical poses. But that's also his importance: A trip to Rome with his patron, Philip of Burgundy, launched more than a century's worth of artistic interaction between north and south.

There hasn't been a major Gossart survey since the 1960s. Sometimes called Mabuse, after his hometown, he gets the full treatment in a survey of about 50 paintings.

Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., New York. Admission $20 (212) 535-7710 or -- Christopher Knight, Art Critic
Photo credit: National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund, 1967
Oct. 2 to Jan. 9 "Olmec: Colossal Masterworks of Ancient Mexico"
Huge, volcanic-stone portrait heads, some weighing more than 40,000 pounds, have puzzled art historians and archaeologists ever since a farmer clearing land in Veracruz, Mexico, stumbled upon the first one about 150 years ago. A legacy of the ancient Olmec civilization, which emerged along the southern Gulf Coast around 1400 BC, the facially specific colossal-heads are now thought to be likenesses of rulers.

The discovery was the first in what turned out to be a remarkable and distinctive array of sculptures, both large and small. Olmec exhibitions are exceedingly rare — the last survey in the U.S. was in 1996 — and this somewhat smaller show, coinciding with the bicentennial of Mexico's independence, is the first ever organized on the West Coast.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. Admission $15. (323) 857-6010 or -- Christopher Knight, Art Critic
Photo credit: Javier Hinojosa / LACMA
Oct. 9 to Jan. 23 "Collection Applied Design: A Kim MacConnel Retrospective"
The critical importance of the Pattern and Decoration art movement that emerged in California and New York in the mid-1970s has been under-recognized. Partly that's because its full-throttle embrace of ornamental strategies and meanings still makes more abstemious viewers nervous.

San Diego's Kim MacConnel has been among P&D's most articulate painters for more than 30 years. His work, in addition to its promiscuous adoption of global styles, also provided a foundation for a subsequent aesthetic of applied design, employed more recently by notable artists such as Jim Isermann, Jorge Pardo and Pae White.

Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, 700 Prospect St., La Jolla. Admission $10. (858) 454-3541 or -- Christopher Knight, Art Critic
Photo credit: Courtesy of artist
Sept. 16 to Jan. 10 "Franz Xaver Messerschmidt 1736-1783: From Neoclassicism to Expressionism"
The "yawner," a "hypocrite and slanderer," "childish weeping," "quiet peaceful sleep" — the descriptive titles for so-called character heads of German-Austrian sculptor Franz Xaver Messerschmidt (1736-83) suggest why they are among the oddest works produced in the 18th century. Each of 49 bronze or marble heads shows a face in distress or other highly specific countenance, as if cataloging states of human emotion.

Messerschmidt had produced un-idealized sculptures for the court in Vienna, but physical (and perhaps psychological) infirmity sent him back to live in his small Bavarian hometown, where he set about making the heads. This survey show, a first, looks at the deep roots of Modern Expressionist art.

Neue Galerie, New York. 1048 Fifth Ave., New York. Admission $15. (212) 628-6200 or -- Christopher Knight, Art Critic
Photo credit: J. Paul Getty Trust
Oct. 3 to April 25 "Abstract Expressionist New York"
Abstract Expressionist art of the 1940s and 1950s is often mistakenly identified as the New York School. In reality, the post-World War II tendency represented a national development evident in work produced in Illinois, Kentucky, Washington, New Mexico and elsewhere, with an especially active group of artists centered in San Francisco.

This big show, drawn exclusively from the Museum of Modern Art's extensive collection of local artists, helpfully charts the New York contingent — including painters as different from one another as Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko and Lee Krasner — who helped turn the city into the international center of the 1950s art world. It will also expand the genre to include every conceivable medium, including film.

Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York. Admission $20 (212) 708-9400 or .-- Christopher Knight, Art Critic
Photo credit: Estate of Jack Tworkov / Courtesy Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
Dec. 12-Feb. 27 "Suprasensorial: Experiments in Light, Color, and Space"
Say "Light and Space art," and the pioneering 1960s work of Los Angeles artists such as Robert Irwin, Larry Bell, Doug Wheeler and many others comes to mind. This show seeks to expand that horizon, taking a focused look at large-scale installations by five important Latin American artists: Carlos Cruz-Diez (Venezuela, b. 1923), Lucio Fontana (Argentina, 1899-1968), Julio Le Parc (Argentina, b. 1928), Hélio Oiticica (Brazil, 1937-1980) and Jesus Rafael Soto (Venezuela, 1923-2005). Sometimes pre-dating developments in L.A., their work ought to give us a good idea of distinctions and correspondences in a major area of postwar art.

MOCA's Geffen Contemporary, 152 N. Central Ave., Los Angeles. Admission $10. (213) 621-1745 or -- Christopher Knight, Art Critic
Photo credit: Artists Rights Society, New York / ADAGP, Paris
Sept. 30 to Oct. 2: Project Bandaloop
The aerial-acrobatic troupe known as Project Bandaloop returns to the Orange County Performing Arts Center this fall to stage a series of free, outdoor performances on the exterior of the Cesar Pelli-designed Segerstrom Hall. The San Francisco-based company will debut a new piece, "Id Ego," and perform "The Second Ninth." Audiences can expect all sorts of gravity-defying acts that include scaling and rappelling on the sides of tall buildings.

OCPAC, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. 8:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. Free. -- David Ng, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Photo credit: Todd Laby / Orange County Performing Arts Center
Sept. 30 to Oct. 3: Mark Morris Dance Group
The modern-dance choreographer brings three of his recent works to Berkeley for their West Coast premieres — "Behemoth," "Looky" and "Socrates." In the spring, Morris' company will come to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to perform "L'Allegro" in a co-production with the Music Center and L.A. Opera.

Zellerbach Hall, 2430 Bancroft Way, Berkeley. 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, 3 p.m., Sunday. $34-$72. -- David Ng, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Photo credit: Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times
Oct. 30: Sankai Juku
The contemporary Butoh dance company will present its piece "Hibiki" as part of the Philharmonic Society of Orange County's JapanOC festival. The festival, a collaboration with New York's Carnegie Hall, will explore Japanese arts and culture through a series of performances that are scheduled through 2011.

Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus Drive, Irvine. 8 p.m., $35-$60. and -- David Ng, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Photo credit: Pomegranate Arts
Oct. 14 to 17: Tere O'Connor's "Wrought Iron Fog"
Considered one of the leading contemporary dance choreographers in the United States, O'Connor brings his latest work, "Wrought Iron Fog," to downtown L.A. for a three-day engagement. A five-member ensemble will enact a series of densely arranged movements that are intended to provoke reflection about the relationship between the body and space.

REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Thursday to Saturday, 7 p.m. Sunday. $16 for Thursday and Friday, $20 for Saturday and Sunday. -- David Ng, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Photo credit: REDCAT
Angelin Preljocaj
French choreographer Angelin Preljocaj brings his piece "Empty Moves (parts I & II)" to the Next Wave Festival. The work is accompanied by excerpts from John Cage's "Empty Words," recorded at a 1977 performance that features boos from the audience.

BAM Howard Gilman Opera House, 30 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 7:30 p.m. Oct. 27, 29-30. $20-$55.
Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus Drive, Irvine. 8 p.m. Nov. 4. $23-$28. (949) 854-4646 or -- David Ng, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Photo credit: JC Carbonne
Oct. 23: Helios Dance Theatre
The L.A.-based Helios Dance Theatre will debut its latest work, "Beautiful Monsters," as part of UCLA Live's 2010-11 season. The piece, choreographed by Helios artistic director Laura Gorenstein Miller, evokes a dreamscape world of childhood nightmares that is both ephemeral and tangible.

Royce Hall at UCLA, 340 Royce Drive, L.A. 8 p.m., $28-$63. -- David Ng, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Photo credit: (Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times
Nov. 5 to 7: Corella Ballet Castilla y León
Spain's classical ballet company arrives at the Music Center for a three-day engagement during which it will perform five pieces — "DGV" and "For 4" by Christopher Wheeldon; Bruch's Violin Concerto No. 1, choreographed by Clark Tippet; "Clear" by Stanton Welch; and "Solea" by flamenco dancer and choreographer María Pagés.

Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., L.A. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. $25 to $105. -- David Ng, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Photo credit: Angel G. Medina / EPA
Nov. 10 to 14: Ralph Lemon's "How Can You Stay in the House All Day and Not Go Anywhere"
Put on your conceptual thinking caps for experimental artist Ralph Lemon's latest performance piece, a hybrid work that brings together dance and video imagery to create a vaguely science fiction story loosely based on the life of a former sharecropper. High-toned references include nods to Andrei Tarkovsky's movie "Solaris" and much more.

REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, 7 p.m. Sunday. $20, Wednesday through Friday; $30, Saturday and Sunday. -- David Ng, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Photo credit: REDCAT
Sept. 11 to Oct. 23: "Nostalgia for the Future"
Deborah Aschheim's drawings of L.A.'s Midcentury landmarks in various states of decay or peril are portraits of an aging Modernism, of the Jet Age going gray. Also with panel discussions planned for a pair of Saturday afternoons, Sept. 25 and Oct 16.

Edward Cella Art + Architecture, 6018 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 525-0053, www.edwardcella.com -- Christopher Hawthorne, Architecture Critic
Photo credit: Deborah Aschheim / Edward Cella Art + Architecture
Sept 15: "Architecture and Beauty: A Troubled Relationship"
In a perverse way, there is probably no better place to hold a star-studded discussion on architecture and beauty than Los Angeles, where noted architects have tended to take inspiration more from the ugliness or at least the banality of the urban surroundings than from beauty in any traditional sense. With Frank Gehry, Thom Mayne, Eric Owen Moss, Greg Lynn, Peter Cook and the co-author of a new book on architecture and beauty, Yael Reisner.

Southern California Institute of Architecture, 960 E. 3rd St., Los Angeles. (213) 613-2200 7:30 p.m. Sept. 15. -- Christopher Hawthorne, Architecture Critic
Photo credit: Bertrand Guay / AFP/Getty Images
Oct. 3 to Jan. 3: "Small Scale, Big Change: New Architectures of Social Engagement"
Forget the icon; here comes architecture with a conscience. The Museum of Modern Art gives its stamp of approval to the movement known as humanitarian design in an exhibition featuring community centers, schools, public housing and other projects in which "the architect is as much a moderator of social processes as a designer of a structure."

Museum of Modern Art, 11 W. 53rd St., New York. (212) 708-9400 -- Christopher Hawthorne, Architecture Critic
Photo credit: Siméon Duchoud / Aga Khan Trust for Culture
Oct. 9 to Jan 2.: "Bruce Goff: A Creative Mind"
Most Angelenos know the idiosyncratic architect Bruce Goff, who died in 1982, only through his Japanese Pavilion at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. This fall, the University of Oklahoma will open an exhibition and related symposium meant to capture the wide scope of his career, which included inventive buildings across the Midwest and in Las Vegas and Venezuela.

Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., Norman, Okla. (405) 325-3272 -- Christopher Hawthorne, Architecture Critic
Photo credit: Ellen Sandor, Chris Kemp, Chris Day, Ben Carney, and Miguel Delgado / Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art
Oct. 10: Crocker Museum extension
The final major building designed by the late Charles Gwathmey, who died last year after a long and prolific career, is an expansive new wing for Sacramento's Crocker Art Museum.

Crocker Art Museum, 216 O St., Sacramento. (916) 808-7000 -- Christopher Hawthorne, Architecture Critic
Photo credit: Brian Suhr / Crocker Art Museum
Dec. 7 to Jan. 30: "Decolonizing Architecture"
Alessandro Petti, Sandi Hilal and Eyal Weizman explore the difficulties of moving past the legacy of occupation in the Middle East, looking in depth at sites in Ramallah and Bethlehem.

REDCAT, West 2nd and Hope streets, Los Angeles. (213) 237-2800 -- Christopher Hawthorne, Architecture Critic
Photo credit: REDCAT
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