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Los Angeles Times

Men's Health: How to keep what you've got

For most men at midlife, the red sports car and emotional tumult are but a myth. They get older, yes, but with aplomb. In our men's health special, find reports on the importance of friends, sex and reviving your stamina.

  • Crisis? What Crisis?

    Crisis? What Crisis?

    For most men at midlife, the red sports car and emotional tumult are but a myth. They get older, yes, but with aplomb.

  • Here's to good buddies, good health

    Here's to good buddies, good health

    WHILE no man is an island, too many are like lonely peninsulas jutting off from the rest of society. In recent decades, close friendships among Americans have dwindled -- especially among certain groups of men. And, experts say, there are consequences to that. Social isolation -- a lack of close...

  • Build your brawn -- for better looks, better living

    Build your brawn -- for better looks, better living

    THE role models are all around us: 60-year-old Sylvester Stallone looking trim and muscular, 65-year-old singer Aaron Neville sporting bulging biceps, and a robust Harrison Ford, 64. What do they have that other men their age don't? Maybe a good strength-training program. Starting at about age...

  • Brainpower: Think upkeep

    Brainpower: Think upkeep

    IF you think of your brain as a car, the sleekest, fastest machine you'll ever own is a 20-year-old brain. It accelerates effortlessly and handles sharp turns with ease. It never stalls. Whether you use that Maserati between your ears to actually go somewhere on the road of life or spend your time...

  • Shave off years, with a little help

    Shave off years, with a little help

    YOU look just like your father, they tell you. Hey, not so fast. Though most men realize that certain signs of aging are inevitable, more are doing what women have done for years -- putting the brakes on looking older. And they're seeking cosmetic medical treatments in record numbers. Although...

  • Recapture the vigor you thought you'd left behind

    Recapture the vigor you thought you'd left behind

    THE job description of little boys includes running around, screaming and fidgeting. But by the time those boys reach midlife, a sea change has often happened. They're falling asleep in front of the TV at 7 p.m. and laboring up stairs they would have bounded up in their prime. Myriad components...

  • Go ahead, have more sex, not less

    Go ahead, have more sex, not less

    THE sex lives of men can seem like an Aesop's fable. As years go by and sexual desire fades, men may stop mating with an enthusiasm akin to rabbits and become more like red foxes, lonely animals who make do with one brief breeding season each year. The moral: Even if you're a happy rabbit now,...

  • A nudge down a different path

    A nudge down a different path

    ON the wrong track? A catalyst for healthful change doesn't have to be gargantuan. Joey Esposito was diagnosed with high cholesterol. Maurice Goldberg bumped into a newly fit old friend. Whatever the impetus, the key is to take small, but significant steps -- and to think of the changes as a lifelong...

  • Take action before it's gone

    Take action before it's gone

    TRYING to prevent hair loss is not a new male obsession. For all we know, cavemen spent time staring into pools arranging their residual tresses into primitive comb-overs. What is new, however, is that today's remedies actually work -- at least to some extent. If you're already losing your hair...

  • Hey, I'll tell you my Max if you tell me yours

    Hey, I'll tell you my Max if you tell me yours

    THERE are certain measurements that define us as men. Yes, there's that one. Then there's the maximum amount of weight you can raise in a bench press in a single stroke, known to red-faced, horizontally herniating gym rats everywhere as the "Max" -- as in, "What's your Max?" The Max -- capitalized...

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