Los Angeles Times

Jim Newton

Columnist

Jim Newton is editor at large of the Los Angeles Times and writes a weekly column for the Op-Ed page on the policy and politics of Southern California. 

Newton came to the Los Angeles Times in 1989, having previously worked as a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and as a clerk at the New York Times, where he served as columnist James Reston's assistant from 1985-86. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College and the recipient of numerous local and national awards. He was part of the Los Angeles Times' coverage of the Los Angeles riots in 1992 and the earthquake of 1994, both of which were awarded Pulitzer Prizes to the staff. 

Newton also is the author of two critically acclaimed, best-selling biographies, "Justice for All: Earl Warren and the Nation He Made," and "Eisenhower: The White House Years."

Recent Articles

  • A mighty big spender illustrates campaign finance problems

    A mighty big spender illustrates campaign finance problems

    Anyone who closely follows American politics runs the risk of becoming inured to the role that money plays in the process. Even before the Supreme Court's infamous —and somewhat misunderstood — ruling in Citizens United, the amount of money in elections was soaring, breaking records pretty much...

  • No winners in this MTA train wreck

    No winners in this MTA train wreck

    It's hard to find winners in the meltdown that occurred last week at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. A Japanese rail car manufacturing company trying to build a plant in Palmdale announced it was tired of fighting a union-supported environmental challenge and instead would build its...

  • Can the California GOP craft a winning campaign strategy?

    Can the California GOP craft a winning campaign strategy?

    As California's Republican Party contemplates its way out of the political wilderness, most of the public debate has focused on questions of ideology: Can social conservatives stomach moderation on issues such as abortion or gay marriage in exchange for election victories? That's a serious question...

  • Mayor Garcetti's 'back to basics' approach is working

    Mayor Garcetti's 'back to basics' approach is working

    There was a little snickering when Mayor Eric Garcetti framed his ambition as getting Los Angeles government “back to basics.” It seemed to some — including me — that this approach, while important, also allowed him to duck larger challenges of leadership in favor of smaller, easier-to-achieve...

  • Deasy's impatience threatens to overshadow LAUSD achievements

    Deasy's impatience threatens to overshadow LAUSD achievements

    There's a storm cloud gathering over Los Angeles politics these days, and the man at its center is schools Supt. John Deasy. In office since 2010, Deasy has fenced with his bosses, the seven-member school board, almost from the get-go. Lately, however, the situation has deteriorated: United Teachers...

  • 'To Make Men Free' is a timely tale of the ever-changing GOP

    'To Make Men Free' is a timely tale of the ever-changing GOP

    With division in Washington a solidifying fact of modern American politics, this is a smart moment for a deep examination of the political faction that gave this country the income tax, that railed against business trusts on behalf of working men and women, that championed immigration, exponentially...

  • Choosing between Shriver, Kuehl for L.A. County supervisor

    Choosing between Shriver, Kuehl for L.A. County supervisor

    The race for the 3rd District seat on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors began in earnest last week, as the contenders — Sheila Kuehl and Bobby Shriver — faced each other in their first debate since qualifying for the runoff. They were hardly past the opening statements before their respective...

  • L.A.'s rush-hour construction ban is costing taxpayers millions

    L.A.'s rush-hour construction ban is costing taxpayers millions

    Soon after taking office in 2005, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa signed an executive order banning construction by "any city department or agency on major roads" during the morning and evening rush hour. It was a popular move, intended to reduce traffic delays and "improve our regional economy, our...

67°