Meghan Daum

Columnist

Meghan Daum was born in California and grew up primarily on the East Coast. She is the author of four books, most recently a collection of original essays, “The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion.” Her other books include the cult favorite essay collection “My Misspent Youth,” as well as a novel and a memoir. She is also the editor of “Selfish, Shallow & Self-Absorbed: Sixteen Writers on the Decision Not to Have Kids,” which will be published in the spring of 2015. Daum has written for numerous magazines, including the New Yorker, Harper’s and Vogue, and contributed to the public radio programs “Morning Edition,” “Marketplace” and “This American Life.” Her column has run on the Op-Ed page since 2005. Learn more about her at meghandaum.com.

Recent Articles

  • 2015: The most hyperbolic year ever

    2015: The most hyperbolic year ever

    It's the end of the year, when newspaper columnists are supposed to fill in the blank — “2015 was the year of _______ ” — and decide whether the phenomenon in question falls into the category of “good thing” or “good riddance.” This year, however, so much of what happened has been framed as larger-than-life,...

  • Forget 'bleeding heart' liberals, the GOP is now the party of feelings

    Forget 'bleeding heart' liberals, the GOP is now the party of feelings

    The term “bleeding heart liberal” sounds musty and outdated, a relic of a time when slogans like “Save the whales” were code for “Worry about everything” and the words “drone strike” conjured up sci-fi, not a progressive president. Still, bleeding heart imagery is emblematic of the associations...

  • Eat, shop, click: Another kind of Black Friday

    Eat, shop, click: Another kind of Black Friday

    How great is technology? It can cure diseases, send humans into space and ensure that we never have to set foot in a Wal-Mart or Best Buy again if we don't want to. On Black Friday, the day we flock to big box stores to save money on flat-screen TVs, that can be a matter of public safety. Every...

  • The tantrums at Mizzou and Yale reveal more than PC problems

    The tantrums at Mizzou and Yale reveal more than PC problems

    At the University of Missouri, it took a hunger-striking student and the threat of a football boycott to get the president and chancellor to step down amid long-standing campus racial tensions. At Yale, it took a viral YouTube video of an angry student upbraiding a faculty member to get the university's...

  • Sanders and Clinton: What's all the shouting about?

    Sanders and Clinton: What's all the shouting about?

    When Bernie Sanders used the word "shouting" during the Democratic presidential debate, he was referring to the tone of the gun control debate, not his opponent Hillary Rodham Clinton. Despite how obvious this was, Clinton (or perhaps her advisors) began slowly re-purposing the word as a sexist...

  • Right-to-dry movement gets its day in the sun in California

    Right-to-dry movement gets its day in the sun in California

    Last week, amid all the excitement (if that's the right word) over Gov. Jerry Brown's signing of a right-to-die bill for California, a smaller, quieter — and rhyming — law was also passed. Assembly Bill 1448, nicknamed the "right to dry," makes it illegal for landlords and homeowners associations...

  • A presidential campaign as reality TV

    A presidential campaign as reality TV

    It's a truism in Hollywood that movies are made in the editing room. No matter how airtight the script, no matter how brilliant the actors, no matter what the director envisioned at the beginning, all bets are off when the footage makes its way to the cutting room. Plot lines shift, characters...

  • Right-to-die laws: Do we have the gumption to make such big life decisions?

    Right-to-die laws: Do we have the gumption to make such big life decisions?

    It's been nearly a year since Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old terminally ill California woman, made headlines with her public decision to take her own life to avoid a painful end from brain cancer. Maynard, who died in November, moved to Oregon because California has no right-to-die laws on the...

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