Meghan Daum

Columnist

Meghan Daum was born in California and grew up primarily on the East Coast. She is the author of four books, most recently a collection of original essays, “The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion.” Her other books include the cult favorite essay collection “My Misspent Youth,” as well as a novel and a memoir. She is also the editor of “Selfish, Shallow & Self-Absorbed: Sixteen Writers on the Decision Not to Have Kids,” which will be published in the spring of 2015. Daum has written for numerous magazines, including the New Yorker, Harper’s and Vogue, and contributed to the public radio programs “Morning Edition,” “Marketplace” and “This American Life.” Her column has run on the Op-Ed page since 2005. Learn more about her at meghandaum.com.

Recent Articles

  • Is Urban Outfitters waving the bloody shirt?

    Is Urban Outfitters waving the bloody shirt?

    It was the hand-me-down from hell: a Kent State University sweatshirt, faded, hole-filled and splattered with red dye — or was that blood? — offered online by Urban Outfitters last weekend for $129. A scandal ensued — and not because of the price tag. Kent State, as you may remember (or have read...

  • The new, tiresome culture of outrage

    The new, tiresome culture of outrage

    There's a scene in "A Piece of Work," the 2010 documentary about comedian Joan Rivers, who died last week, in which she shoots down a heckler while performing in a casino in northern Wisconsin. In so doing, she effectively explains the purpose of humor in society. After she delivers a throwaway...

  • Our bodies, our selfies: Is Jennifer Lawrence to blame because she took the photos?

    Our bodies, our selfies: Is Jennifer Lawrence to blame because she took the photos?

    Amid roiling political unrest overseas, the American pop culture scene is facing its own crisis this week. Last weekend, hackers uploaded hundreds of nude photos of female celebrities onto the Internet, many of them selfies and all of them stolen from private data storage accounts. Though it's...

  • Power to the social media 'Invisibles'

    Power to the social media 'Invisibles'

    "We are living in a time when the most radical act is to refuse to talk about yourself." So went a tweet I noticed last week (sent, incidentally, by someone not particularly known for talking about herself). It resonated with me and I retweeted it to my followers, several of whom retweeted it too....

  • Robin Williams: A Mork in the family

    Robin Williams: A Mork in the family

    As sitcoms of its era went, “Mork & Mindy” was neither the best nor the worst. It may, however, have been among the sneakiest in its social commentary. A “Happy Days” spinoff that ran from 1978 to 1982, its premise was that Mork, an alien from the planet Ork, played by Robin Williams, is sent to...

  • The great Ebola scare

    The great Ebola scare

    Blame it on Richard Preston. “The Hot Zone,” his 1994 nonfiction science thriller about the spread and devastation of the Ebola virus, pretty much set the standard for terrifying contagion scenarios. In an opening chapter that even Stephen King called “one of the most horrifying things I've ever...

  • Weird Al's viral zaniness is a note of sanity in a time of crises

    Weird Al's viral zaniness is a note of sanity in a time of crises

    Amid a week of unrelentingly grim news, a buoyant countercurrent has emerged. Over the course of eight days, July 14 to 21, the song parodist "Weird Al" Yankovic released eight videos promoting his new album, "Mandatory Fun." In classic Yankovic style, the songs take pop hits and give them new...

  • When cellphones and social media become the enemy

    When cellphones and social media become the enemy

    There's a moment in “Boyhood,” the new movie by Richard Linklater, when the boy in question, an eighth-grader, asks his mother for permission to attend a party that won't have adult supervision. Reluctantly, she agrees, saying it's OK as long as he takes his cellphone. Cut to a gathering of boys...

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