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Higher Education

  • UCLA faculty overwhelmingly approves required courses on diversity
    UCLA faculty overwhelmingly approves required courses on diversity

    UCLA’s faculty approved, by a large margin, a controversial new policy that requires most future undergraduates to take a course on ethnic, cultural, religious or gender diversity.

  • Universities add degree programs while spurning fads
    Universities add degree programs while spurning fads

    At Cal State Dominguez Hills, recreation and leisure studies are out and cyber-security is in. The geography major at USC has morphed into a new degree program called spatial studies. And Russian and German language programs at UC Riverside are virtually kaput, while Southeast Asian and Middle...

  • Korean-language classes are growing in popularity at U.S. colleges
    Korean-language classes are growing in popularity at U.S. colleges

    When Olivia Hernandez was a middle schooler in Oxnard, she became hooked on K-wave — the global phenomenon of South Korean pop music, television and culture. Inspired by the romantic series "My Lovely Sam Soon" and bands like Clazziquai, she taught herself the Korean alphabet and learned a few...

In the Schools

More Education News

  • Doctors at UC student health clinics start strike
    Doctors at UC student health clinics start strike

    Unionized doctors began a rolling strike Thursday at student health clinics on UC campuses, accusing the university of unfair labor practices during negotiations for the physicians’ first contract.

  • Students put expertise into plain English
    Students put expertise into plain English

    It was a simple question: What do you study? But UCLA doctoral candidate Oscar Campos started to give anything but a simple answer — he talked about cells and biology and how his research related to cancer but that he wasn't technically a cancer cell biologist. And then he stopped.

  • UC San Diego management school receives a $100-million pledge
    UC San Diego management school receives a $100-million pledge

    UC San Diego’s management and business school will receive an additional $100 million in donations over time from financier and insurance industry executive Ernest Rady and his family foundation, the university announced Tuesday.

  • How to even the educational playing field for Latino kids
    How to even the educational playing field for Latino kids

    On the day they start kindergarten, Latino children are often already at a disadvantage. Their social skills and readiness to listen and learn are top-notch, but their cognitive and verbal skills, abilities that strongly predict future academic success, tend to be significantly less developed than...

  • Leaf blower as metaphor in a conversation with Green Dot schools founder
    Leaf blower as metaphor in a conversation with Green Dot schools founder

    California recently hung out with education rabble-rouser Steve Barr, consuming expensive caffeine at Grand Central Market's G

  • Laws to prevent abuse of GI Bill benefits weren't enforced, records show
    Laws to prevent abuse of GI Bill benefits weren't enforced, records show

    Helicopter flight training companies were able to collect tens of millions of dollars a year through a loophole in the latest GI Bill in part because officials didn't enforce laws aimed at preventing abuse of veteran education benefits, according to interviews, court records and state and federal...

  • UC extends discounted tuition to military veterans
    UC extends discounted tuition to military veterans

    Military veterans and their dependents who are UC students will be able to pay lower in-state tuition even if they otherwise are not eligible, the UC regents decided Thursday.

  • Brown, Napolitano vague about progress of their UC funding confab
    Brown, Napolitano vague about progress of their UC funding confab

    Gov. Jerry Brown and UC President Janet Napolitano said Wednesday that they are making progress in their unusual two-person effort examining the spending and funding of UC but offered no concrete details on whether they are nearing a compromise on disagreements over possible tuition hikes.

  • Pierce College students hungry for on-campus dining options
    Pierce College students hungry for on-campus dining options

    While attending Pierce College last fall, Edward Galan ate lunch most days at food trucks that gathered in the school's parking lot.

  • SAE chapters in California have faced discipline over rule breaking
    SAE chapters in California have faced discipline over rule breaking

    Well before the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity in Oklahoma became infamous for videotaped racist chants, SAE chapters in California were involved in numerous serious incidents, including a hazing death, the closing of two houses and disciplinary sanctions for drinking and conduct problems.

  • Cal State is tightening admissions criteria to control demand
    Cal State is tightening admissions criteria to control demand

    Diego Aguilar Avila enrolled in Cal State Northridge last fall, and the freshman says he's lucky to have gotten in when he did.

  • Health benefits are a promise school districts find hard to keep
    Health benefits are a promise school districts find hard to keep

    California school districts once viewed lifetime healthcare coverage for employees as a cheap alternative to pay raises. That decision is coming back to haunt school leaders, and districts are scrambling to limit the lucrative benefit promised decades ago.

  • Preschools a microcosm of debate on measles vaccinations
    Preschools a microcosm of debate on measles vaccinations

    For 19 years, the director of the Laguna Parent Participation Preschool has worked alongside mothers and fathers to decide such questions as what children should eat during snack breaks and what type of field trips they should take.

  • Classes that go off the grid help students focus
    Classes that go off the grid help students focus

    USC professor Geoffrey Cowan is a scholar of free speech and communication. But Cowan, the former dean of the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, insists that students sometimes should be cut off from the social media and websites that are so prevalent in their lives.

  • Election sets stage for L.A. Unified battle
    Election sets stage for L.A. Unified battle

    Over the last few months, Los Angeles teachers union leaders have racked up a series of victories. They worked to push out Supt. John Deasy, elect a friendly candidate to the school board and win a ruling against a new evaluation system.

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