IMMIGRATION

LATEST IMMIGRATION NEWS

Proposed cuts in aid to Cubans could save taxpayers billions

A bill to restrict welfare for Cuban immigrants would save U.S. taxpayers a whopping $2.45 billion over the next decade, congressional analysts estimate. The proposed legislation, spurred by a Sun Sentinel investigation and introduced in recent months by U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo and Sen. Marco...

  • Library of Congress to stop using term 'illegal alien'

    Library of Congress to stop using term 'illegal alien'

    The Library of Congress, saying a once common phrase had become offensive, announced it will no longer use “illegal aliens” as a bibliographical term. The library will now use “noncitizens” and “unauthorized immigration” when referring to individuals and the larger phenomenon of people residing...

  • For some migrants in Texas, obtaining healthcare means getting through immigration checkpoint

    For some migrants in Texas, obtaining healthcare means getting through immigration checkpoint

    Elias Soto Sanchez’s chief concern as an ambulance carried him north to a hospital in San Antonio was not his broken right foot — it was his wife. “You cannot go with me,” Blanca Soto recalled her husband saying when he phoned from the ambulance. The couple has raised three children while living...

  • Central American immigrants fleeing due to violence, poverty, and now fears of Trump's proposals

    Central American immigrants fleeing due to violence, poverty, and now fears of Trump's proposals

    As they have for the last two years, the migrant youths and families arriving at the small Roman Catholic church in the Rio Grande Valley told stories of fleeing the growing violence and staggering poverty of Central America. But some said they are also being driven north to the border town by...

  • For Los Angeles teens traveling to see Pope Francis, an unexpected reunion

    For Los Angeles teens traveling to see Pope Francis, an unexpected reunion

    Iris Alondra Hipolito, a 17-year-old high school student from Los Angeles, didn’t know what was coming. She and her brother Luis, 14, had traveled on an overnight bus to El Paso and arrived Tuesday morning as part of a group of Catholics and immigrant rights activists from Southern California....

  • The journey of two families in two countries, split by a chain-link fence

    The journey of two families in two countries, split by a chain-link fence

    On the Mexican side of the border, they drove a battered brown Chevy sedan, slogging through rutted pavement and dirt streets lined with cinder-block shanties and school buses ferrying workers to the maquiladoras — manufacturing plants that fuel the local economy. On the U.S. side, they drove a...

  • Hoping to rally migrants' cause, L.A. pilgrims head off to see Pope Francis

    Hoping to rally migrants' cause, L.A. pilgrims head off to see Pope Francis

    Every weekday, Iris Alondra Hipolito waits for her 14-year-old brother Luis to arrive home from school. The 17-year-old fixes Luis a meal of rice and shredded beef before she sits down to help with homework. She asks him about his day. “I play the role of mom now,” Iris said. Si desea leer esta...

  • A Border Patrol agent shot a drug-running suspect, but the agency won't reveal much more

    A Border Patrol agent shot a drug-running suspect, but the agency won't reveal much more

      The one-story ranch house looks lonely, even from the highway, slouched on a dust-blown ridge 30 miles from the Mexican border. Here lived the Beans, according to a nameplate long since abandoned. Now, according to locals, it serves as a convenient way station for migrants and drug cartel lookouts...

  • Haphazard government care left migrant children vulnerable to human trafficking, senators say

    Haphazard government care left migrant children vulnerable to human trafficking, senators say

    Migrant children in the government's care were placed in U.S. homes and left vulnerable to human trafficking due to sometimes nonexistent screening by the Department of Health and Human Services, according to a congressional report released Thursday. The investigation says HHS failed to run background...

  • A California 'Dreamer' goes home to Mexico. But 'home' proves elusive

    A California 'Dreamer' goes home to Mexico. But 'home' proves elusive

    After her mother whisked her away at age 8 from her pueblo in Oaxaca to the Mid-City neighborhood of Los Angeles, Veronica Martinez Sanchez forgot most of what her life was like at the foot of Picacho Mountain. The few memories that remained were of the loquat tree she climbed as a child and the...

  • Deportations revive rift between Obama and fellow Democrats

    Deportations revive rift between Obama and fellow Democrats

    President Obama had long endured the “deporter-in-chief” label, shedding it only in 2014 when he used executive action to stop the removal of millions of otherwise law-abiding immigrants in the U.S. illegally. Then, over the recent holiday season, deportations began again. In weekend raids, Immigration...

  • Immigration officials plan stepped-up deportations for new year

    Immigration officials plan stepped-up deportations for new year

    Immigration officials are preparing a nationwide push in January to find and deport Central American families who arrived in recent years and have been ordered by immigration judges to leave, according to officials familiar with the plan.‎ The new push is intended to send a signal to people thinking...

  • Immigrant deaths along Mexico border decrease, officials say, but critics are left wondering

    Immigrant deaths along Mexico border decrease, officials say, but critics are left wondering

    For the third straight year, migrant deaths along the southern border have decreased, even in some areas where the number of migrant children and families crossing increased over the summer, authorities said Tuesday. U.S. Customs and Border Protection reported that there were 240 migrant deaths...

  • Amid holiday cheer in Texas, the grim task of finding missing migrants

    Amid holiday cheer in Texas, the grim task of finding missing migrants

    It’s time for the South Texas Human Rights Center holiday open house to start, guests due any minute, fragrant tamales heating in a crock pot, but Eddie Canales is still on the phone. His manner is serious, concerned, as he takes notes on an index card. “When did he cross the river?” Canales asks...

  • A Syrian Christian, seeking asylum, wonders why he's in custody in Texas

    A Syrian Christian, seeking asylum, wonders why he's in custody in Texas

    After his village in Syria came under repeated rocket attacks earlier this year, the 32-year-old Christian barber knew he had to save his wife and two boys, ages 5 and 2. He had once applied to immigrate to the United States, hoping to join his parents and sister, who live in California. But that...

  • Who were the Syrians who showed up at the Texas border? Some are Christians

    Who were the Syrians who showed up at the Texas border? Some are Christians

    When Syrians showed up at a Texas border crossing twice in one week last month amid the national debate about screening Syrian refugees, some immigration officials and lawmakers became alarmed, afraid they might be Muslim terrorists. Turns out, the first group of Syrians who arrived at the Laredo...

  • Supreme Court scheduling order in Obama immigration case bodes well for a faster ruling

    In a move cheered by immigration advocates, the Supreme Court has put itself in position to decide on President Obama's latest deportation-deferral plan by next summer, thanks to an unusual scheduling order. At issue is the fate of Obama's executive order to give temporary deportation relief and...

  • Arizona sheriff hopes Russian-designed rubber-bullet handgun will save lives

    Arizona sheriff hopes Russian-designed rubber-bullet handgun will save lives

    In the open country along the Southwest border, law enforcement is often a game of distance and numbers. Smugglers, human traffickers and migrants entering the country illegally count on vast stretches of unguarded border to ensure safe passage. That leaves Border Patrol agents and county sheriff’s...

  • New wave of Cuban immigrants reaches U.S., but through Texas, not Florida

    New wave of Cuban immigrants reaches U.S., but through Texas, not Florida

    When Jordanis Perez fled Havana this spring for the United States, he decided his best chances weren't by boat to Florida, but by a route increasingly favored by thousands of Cuban migrants— by land to Texas. The number of Cubans arriving at the southern border increased this year after President...

  • Why fewer Mexicans are leaving their homeland for the U.S.

    Why fewer Mexicans are leaving their homeland for the U.S.

    To its southern neighbor, the United States once represented hope, safety and prosperity. But with the effects of the Great Recession still lingering and tougher enforcement along the U.S. border, fewer Mexicans see a reason to leave their homeland.“There isn't much work because the economy there...

  • Border agents won't face charges in Taser-related death of Mexican man

    Border agents won't face charges in Taser-related death of Mexican man

    Federal prosecutors will not bring charges in the case of a Mexican man who died of a heart attack after he was hit and struck with a Taser by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents at a border checkpoint in California five years ago, the Justice Department said Friday after closing the investigation....

  • Should Border Patrol require body cameras? Internal review says no

    Should Border Patrol require body cameras? Internal review says no

    An internal review by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials found that staff at the nation's largest law enforcement agency shouldn't be required to wear body cameras in the field, despite the growing popularity of the devices among police and advocates.   According to a copy reviewed by...

  • Immigrant family detention centers are prison-like, critics say, despite order to improve

    Immigrant family detention centers are prison-like, critics say, despite order to improve

    On deadline to improve immigrant family detention centers, Obama administration officials said they had converted the facilities into short-term processing sites, holding more families in recent months but for less time. Immigrant advocates, however, say that conditions at the centers remain prison-like,...

  • Why border crossings are down but deaths are up in brutal Arizona desert

    Why border crossings are down but deaths are up in brutal Arizona desert

    With a significant slowdown in the surge of migrants streaming across the Southwest border, it stands to reason that the number of deaths among those braving the crippling heat of Arizona’s desert frontier with Mexico would also decline.  But it didn't.  In fact, even more people died attempting...

  • Four migrants flee Tucson shelter, yet another concern for immigration system

    Four migrants flee Tucson shelter, yet another concern for immigration system

    Four Honduran teenage boys are missing after they ran away from a federally funded shelter in Tucson this month, sparking concern among both conservative and liberal critics of the system for housing immigrant youths. Both sides say the program needs more oversight and transparency. “They have...

  • Democrats move left on immigration, GOP to the right

    Democrats move left on immigration, GOP to the right

    American views on immigration have grown more polarized, with Republicans taking harder-line positions as Democrats and independents take more liberal stands, a new poll indicates. The shift can be seen on several issues, including whether children born in the U.S. to people in the country illegally...

  • Immigration: Quicker release for detained migrants but also greater risk

    Immigration: Quicker release for detained migrants but also greater risk

    Any day now, the young Guatemalan immigrant and his 4-year-old will learn their fate: release into the U.S. as an asylum seeker, or deportation. Rene Ciprian Ordonez, 23, was interviewed last week at the family detention center here where he was transferred after he and his son crossed the border...

  • Joe Arpaio denies willfully violating judge's ban on racial profiling

    Joe Arpaio denies willfully violating judge's ban on racial profiling

    Sheriff Joe Arpaio was once the tip of the spear in the conservative push to deport people in the country illegally. Brash, smirking and politically bulletproof, he long thundered from his Arizona stronghold about the threat posed by people south of the U.S. border. In 2012 he was interviewed by...

  • Along the border, who's an 'anchor baby' is a guessing game

    Along the border, who's an 'anchor baby' is a guessing game

    The mother arrived at the hospital last week in need of an emergency caesarean section, saying she had crossed the border to run an errand in town, not so her baby would be born an American citizen. She assured the doctor that she arrived at the hospital just "because [she] was here." Dr. Rolando...

  • Advocates protest Latina immigrant's arrest at Texas doctor's office

    Advocates protest Latina immigrant's arrest at Texas doctor's office

    Blanca Borrego has been living in the U.S. illegally for a dozen years, so she didn’t think she was risking arrest when she went to her gynecologist’s office this month. Her husband works and has private health insurance for the family. But sheriff’s deputies surprised the mother of three, handcuffing...

  • U.S. judge dismisses challenge of Arizona's SB 1070 immigration law

    U.S. judge dismisses challenge of Arizona's SB 1070 immigration law

    Challengers of Arizona's landmark immigration law failed to show that police would enforce the statute differently for Latinos than they would for people of other ethnicities, a judge said in a ruling that dismissed the last of seven challenges to the law. The ruling could signal the end of the...

  • Court lifts a ban on day laborers in New York town, but the fight isn't over

    Court lifts a ban on day laborers in New York town, but the fight isn't over

    Though a New York federal judge struck down a Long Island town’s ban on day laborers soliciting work on public sidewalks, advocates say day laborers are still vulnerable to exploitation and that local governments are trying to find new ways to restrict their ability to find work. Municipal ordinances...

  • Immigration: Are male detainees treated differently than women?

    Immigration: Are male detainees treated differently than women?

    Jorge Ramirez fled Honduras with his family in June, paying a smuggler to take them across the Rio Grande to seek asylum. To Ramirez, 32, a propane salesman, the U.S. offered hope. “I thought they would help us,” he said of immigration officials. “I never thought they would treat us the way they...

  • Border Patrol chief visits Texas and warns immigrants of deportation

    Border Patrol chief visits Texas and warns immigrants of deportation

    The Border Patrol's top official visited an immigrant processing center in a converted warehouse Wednesday to promote a public awareness campaign aimed at preventing Central American immigrants from ending up in this border city.As he stood flanked by immigration and Central American consular officials,...

  • Young immigrants placed in sponsor homes are at risk of abuse, experts say

    Young immigrants placed in sponsor homes are at risk of abuse, experts say

    A 15-year-old girl who crossed the border from Central America illegally last summer was placed by a U.S. government agency with a Santa Ana relative who demanded the girl go to work, rather than school, to earn her keep. To pressure the girl, the relative withheld food and kept the refrigerator...

  • Judge orders prompt release of immigrant children from detention

    Judge orders prompt release of immigrant children from detention

    A federal judge has once again dealt a blow to the Obama administration’s immigration policies, ordering federal officials to promptly release children held at family detention facilities. The judge, in a ruling released Friday evening, said that children should not be held for more than 72 hours...

  • As immigration judges' working conditions worsen, more may choose retirement

    As immigration judges' working conditions worsen, more may choose retirement

    Immigration Judge Eliza Klein had more than 20 years' experience hearing cases in Boston, Miami and, most recently, Chicago when a surge of immigrants arrived last summer. In addition to the backlog of cases she already faced, Klein started seeing more Central American youths seeking asylum. “I...

  • Detained immigrant mothers and children trapped in legal limbo

    Detained immigrant mothers and children trapped in legal limbo

    Hundreds of immigrant families remained locked up and in limbo this week after attorneys for the Obama administration resisted a judge's order concerning the increasingly controversial family detention system the attorneys appear determined to defend.The administration's latest response came after...

  • Latest complaint on family detention: Few Spanish-speaking staffers

    Latest complaint on family detention: Few Spanish-speaking staffers

    This year, Olivia Lopez was called in to translate for an inconsolable Central American mother held at a detention center with other immigrant families. Lopez recalled that the woman “would not stop crying.” Clinic staff members explained why. “The story I was told was she was a prostitute back...

  • Paid $1 to $3 a day, unauthorized immigrants keep family detention centers running

    Paid $1 to $3 a day, unauthorized immigrants keep family detention centers running

    Delmi Cruz fled Honduras in September with her son Alexis, 11, illegally crossing the border into the U.S. and ending up at a family detention center in rural Texas. “I worked immediately,” Cruz said. “In order to have something to eat, to buy treats for my son.” Cruz, 36, cleaned bathrooms, hallways...

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