Haiti: Coping with the aftermath

Hi-res images from Los Angeles Times photographers Carolyn Cole, Rick Loomis and Brian Vander Brug.

WARNING: GALLERY CONTAINS GRAPHIC CONTENT

PRAYER: Residents of St. Louis Gonzaga IDP Camp pray in front of tents during a three-day mourning period for the country.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

CATHEDRAL: In Port-au-Prince, a man stands in the ruins of the Notre Dame Cathedral at the start of a three-day period of national mourning in Haiti, a month after the devastating earthquake Jan. 12 that killed an estimated 200,000 people.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

FOOD: Women leave with bags of rice after a food handout in Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

BACK TO SCHOOL: Etienne Louis, 7, left, and his brother Samuel, 5, try to listen to their teacher despite an argument in the courtyard of Plein Soleil school in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

WASHING UP: A broken water main pipe gives downtown residents the opportunity to bath and wash their clothes.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

FRANTIC FOR FOOD: A crowd gathered for food distribution gets out of control despite a heavy police presence in Cite Soleil, one of the poorest neighborhoods in Port-Au-Prince. Thousands gathered at a gate trying to get food.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

DESPERATION: Desperate Haitians try to push through a gate at a food handout in the poor Port-au-Prince neighborhood of Cite Soleil. Some women collapsed from exhaustion in the crush of people trying to get food.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

RESCUED: U.S. Army Spc. Nelson Whitney of the 82nd Airborne Division assists a severely dehydrated man who was pulled out of the rubble of a collapsed building in downtown Port-Au-Prince. It is unknown whether he had been trapped for two weeks since the original earthquake.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

HUNGRY: Two women collapse from exhaustion after fighting the line to reach a food handout. Despite a heavy police presence in Cite Soleil, one of the poorest neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince, the food distribution became violent. Thousands crowded at a gate trying to get food.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

ORPHANAGE: Children living at the Horizon of Hope orphanage in Port-au-Prince are still sleeping outdoors two weeks after the earthquake. Many of them have already been adopted.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

EXHAUSTED: Water is poured over the head of an elderly woman who collapsed while trying to make her way through a crowd to reach a food handout in the Cite Soleil neighborhood in Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

DUMPED: Thousands of bodies were improperly dumped at a mass grave site known as Titanyen, north of Port-au-Prince. The remains of more than 2,000 people were later given proper burials by Food For The Poor volunteers.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

LIFE GOES ON: A Haitian woman eyes a man flirting with her as life goes on in a tent camp on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

WATER: Rudeson Laurent, 10, takes a drink of water after brushing his teeth on a smoldering pile of trash.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

BATHING: Girls bathe in the tent camp, where residents make do without amenities such as electricity and running water.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

SMILE: A young Haitian woman in the tent camp still finds a reason to smile.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

PREACHERS: Street preachers extol the power of God to residents of the tent camp.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

KITE: A Haitian boy flies a kite over the tent camp that has become his home.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

FOOD DISTRIBUTION: United Nations troops from Uruguay try to control the crowd of thousands so that sacks of rice from the U.S. can be distributed in the capital, Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

CROWD CONTROL: A U.N. soldier uses his weapon, which fires tear gas, to push back people scrambling for sacks of rice at a distribution point in Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

OUT OF FOOD: A U.N. soldier from Uruguay tries to hold back a surging crowd at a food distribution point in Port-au-Prince. Thousands waited for rice, but supplies ran out.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

FOOD AID: Residents of Cite Soleil leave with food supplies delivered by the U.S. military's 82nd Airborne and UN soldiers from Brazil.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

CITE SOLEIL: Residents of Cite Soleil line up for aid next to an open sewer filled with trash, some of it smoldering, as a U.N. peacekeeper from Brazil stands watch.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

DAWN PRAYER: A woman prays at the break of dawn in Port-au-Prince. At night, rich and poor take to the streets to sleep, worried about being caught in their homes if aftershocks hit.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

SUNDAY BEST: A young girl is dressed in her best available clothes to attend the funeral Mass for Roman Catholic Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot, 63, and Charles Benoit, the general vicar of the church, at the ruins of the Notre Dame Cathedral in Port-au-Prince.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

MOURNERS: A woman overcome by emotion is helped away during the funeral for Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot and General Vicar Charles Benoit in front of the destroyed Notre Dame Cathedral in Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

BANK SECURITY: United Nations troops keep guard at a newly-opened bank in Petionville, a suburb of Port-au-Prince. It was the first day since the quake that customers were allowed in to withdraw money and make transactions.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

COFFIN: Louis Joseph Valentine lowers his mother Therese Theodore, 76, into a casket after she died on Wednesday. Valentine, whose home was leveled in the quake, says his mother didn't get medical care in time. Her casket was carried to the nearby Central Cemetery.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

BURIAL: Therese Theodore's casket is taken to the Central Cemetery after she died of a leg injury.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

CLEARING A PATH: A man riding on a backhoe in downtown Port-au-Prince waves. Heavy equipment is being moved into downtown as cleanup begins sporadically in the quake-ravaged city.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

HITCHING A RIDE: Three people including a man with a full leg cast, ride through Port-au-Prince.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

SUSPECT: Police detain a man suspected of looting in downtown Port-au-Prince. The man, who refused to be identified, was later released.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

QUEUEING FOR CASH: Hundreds of Haitians line up at a money transfer store to collect remittances from family abroad. The city's banks will open for the first time Jan. 23 since the 7.0 quake hit last week.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

HEADING OUT: People, many of them aid workers trying to get home, wait in the shade for flights out at the airport in Port-au-Prince.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

PORT-AU-PRINCE AIRPORT: People line up on the tarmac for a flight out at the airport in Port-au-Prince.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

SUPPLIES ARRIVE: Aircraft, both civilian and military, from countries all over the world continue to bring in aid to the airport in Port-au-Prince. Three other airfields also are being used, two nearby and one in the Dominican Republic.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

LINING UP FOR FOOD: Haitians line up in front of the presidential palace in Port-au-Prince for handouts of food and water from Brazilian troops with the United Nations.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

HANDOUTS: People queue for food and water handouts from Brazilian troops serving with the United Nations.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

SUPPLIES: A woman gets a supply of food and water from Brazilian troops with the United Nations. The U.N.'s World Food Program said it had distributed 1.5 million rations, mostly high-energy biscuits.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

PLEA: A banner calling for help in the Delmas 36 neighborhood in Port-au-Prince. U.S. officials said they are using three additional airfields to speed the arrival of supplies.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

VICTIM: Rose Marie Riviera offers a portrait of her son Robert to a friend in downtown Port-au-Prince where she and her husband returned to their hardware store to assess damage. Robert, 18, was killed last week when the magnitude 7.0 quake struck.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

ON THE STREETS: Jocelyne Arther sweeps trash into a bonfire in an alley, where she lives with her family since moving out of her quake-damaged home in Delmas 36. Residents of the neighborhood are organizing to get food, water and tents because most are living on the streets, afraid or unable to move back into their damaged homes.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

VIOLENCE: Michel Chedler, 28, is taken in by police after he was beaten during an argument over stolen property and chased by a mob chanting, "You stole! You stole!" in Port-au-Prince. The police planned to let him go after the crowd dispersed.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

OUT OF GAS: A man pushes a truck with an empty gas tank in Port-au-Prince. Gasoline is scarce.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

ALL SMILES: Young girls peer out of their corrugated steel home on the wharf in Port-au-Prince. U.S. military officials said the seaport is being reopened partially and will be able to handle up to 250 containers.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

WAITING FOR CASH: People line up at a money transfer office in Port-au-Prince, hoping to get money from relatives abroad. Many waited in line for hours without getting in before closing time.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

MAKING DO: Women carry supplies past a collapsed Texaco gas station in Port-au-Prince. Gasoline supplies may become a problem as a pier servicing tankers was damaged in the earthquake.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

BONANZA: Scrap metal collectors wait for a backhoe to finish moving chunks of a fallen building before scrambling to salvage steel rebar in Port-au-Prince, the Haitian capital. Since the earthquake, salvage activity has exploded into all areas of the city instead of only the dump.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

REBAR IN THE RUBBLE: A scrap collector in Port-au-Prince hammers away concrete in the effort to get at rebar in the rubble.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

TOP-HEAVY: A scrap collector walks through a Port-au-Prince intersection carrying salvaged metal items on his head.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

PULLING HIS WEIGHT: A scrap collector pulls a bwet, a wooden cart laden with wood he will use for cooking fuel, through the streets of downtown Port-au-Prince.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

LOOTERS: In what has become a daily ritual in downtown Port-au-Prince, looters carry goods out of stores, all while keeping an eye on nearby police.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

CATHEDRAL IN RUINS: A man ducks under police tape warning passersby to avoid the ruins of the Notre Dame Cathedral of Port-au-Prince after a 5.9-magnitude aftershock shook the Haitian capital.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

SHOTGUN: A policeman aims his shotgun toward looters in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

TAKING REFUGE: Haitian families take refuge in the streets in Port-au-Prince after a powerful aftershock. Thousands of earthquake survivors have stayed outdoors instead of indoors because their homes were ruined in the earthquake or they fear new temblors.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

HAITIAN FLAG: A Haitian flag flies at half-staff in front of the collapsed presidential palace in Port-au-Prince. The flag, which is usually raised everyday, was placed in front of the ruins seven days after the deadly earthquake.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

SEEKING WORK: Haitian men wait for work from visiting journalists in front of the Oloffson Hotel in Port-au-Prince.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

DAMAGED MURAL: A damaged mural in Port-au-Prince displays artistic symbolism for death.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

FOOD LINE: Children cling to adults as they push forward in a food handout line run by American troops in Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

KEEPING ORDER: A member of the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division keeps a line of Haitians moving toward a food and water handout in Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

FOOD AND WATER: Thousands of Haitians line up for food and water at a camp near the United States ambassador's residence in Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

NATIONAL FLAG: In Port-au-Prince, Haitian guards raise the national flag to half-staff in front of the National Palace, which was destroyed in the earthquake.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

CONCERN: A man gazes at the Port-au-Prince chicken shop where he worked for many years as men protect items in a truck.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

RUBBLE: woman navigates through the rubble in downtown Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

PALACE: Haiti's presidential palace.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

LINING UP: Men line up for the chance to earn a bit of money loading goods in downtown Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

AMPUTEE: Patrick Nore, 20, a university student, was at school when the earthquake struck. His left arm had to be amputated three days after he was injured because he had not received assistance in time.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

OUTBOUND: U.S. citizens wait to board a flight out of Haiti.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

U.S. NAVY: Members of the U.S. Navy are helping transfer personnel around the country, as well as delivering water.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

SCHOOL BUS: A boy waits in front of a converted school bus at a Port-au-Prince bus depot. Haitians are leaving for the countryside en masse.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

JAMMED: Buses are jammed when they leave Port-au-Prince and empty when they return.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

RAINFALL: The Alnnus brothers, from right, Kerwens, Hans and Jenskaid, wait in a chapel doorway as rain briefly falls on Port-au-Prince. Haitians are worried that if intense rains come, damaged structures in the capital may slide down the hillsides, causing more death and misery.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

WAITING: The Theodore family waits in Port-au-Prince for a bus to take them to the countryside
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

BUS DEPOT: Deacon Shawl looks out onto the loading area at a Port-au-Prince bus depot.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

HAIRCUT: Willins Jean, 9, cries as he gets a haircut in an alley in Port-au-Prince, where many businesspeople have set up shop in the streets. The boy said he was crying because he was hungry.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

FROM ABOVE: An aerial view provides greater perspective on damage wrought to downtown Port-au-Prince in the 7.0 earthquake one week ago today.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

TENT CITY: Tent camps are set up in dirt fields all over the city of Port-au-Prince for those who have lost their homes and others too afraid to sleep inside.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

DEPARTING: A U.S. citizen is helped aboard a flight leaving the country.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

BURNING: Fires burn in downtown Port-au-Prince, where most of the buildings have been destroyed.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

WAITING: Nearly a week after the quake struck, Seraphine Joseph is still waiting to be cared for at a clinic in the town of Leogane.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

FOOD: Rebecca Brutus, 4, hangs on tight to a package of food her family received in Leogane.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

MAKING DO: Nearly a week after the quake struck Haiti, the people of Leogane are making do for themselves. Angelo Meyanse, 13, collects bricks from a church that was destroyed. The bricks will be used by his family to make a new home.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

INJURED: Patients at a clinic in Leogane, a sugarcane-producing area outside Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

DESTROYED: Nearly all of the buildings in downtown Port-au-Prince were destroyed. Burning ruins send smoke over the city.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

DAMAGED HOME: In Leogane, nearly every home has been damaged.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

WATER: People wait to fill water containers with a hose on a Port-au-Prince street.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

RUBBLE: A woman sorts belongings atop the rubble of her home in Port-au-Prince, the capital.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

SALVAGE: Young women balance a mattress in the capital.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

DIVERSION: Men play dominoes in the street in front of the French Embassy in Port-au-Princei. Some residents are beginning the attempt to resume their lives after last week's 7.0 earthquake.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

BOY: A young boy carries a table on John Brown Street in Port-au-Prince.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

MURAL: Cracks have damaged a mural on the facade of a hair salon in the capital, Port-au-Prince.
(Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)

PRAYING: On the first Sunday after the 7.0 earthquake hit Haiti, an elderly woman prays in front of the National Cathedral in Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

WAITING FOR WATER: Five-year-old Jean Delimat await a chance to fill his jug from a broken water pipe as others try to bathe in the water.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

CHAOS: Looters continue to steal over the body of a man who has just been shot and killed by police in central Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

CHAOTIC CONDITIONS: On the first Sunday after the quake, at 9:00am in the morning, the streets of downtown Port-au-Prince are filled with people scavenging. Onlookers add to the crowd.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

SCAVENGING: A crowd swarms a building in downtown Port-au-Prince, where the number of people scavenging continues to rise.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

GOODS FROM STORE: A looter makes off with rolls of fabric from an earthquake-wrecked store in downtown Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

PYRE: A man feeds a fire he set to burn a corpse in downtown Port-au-Prince four days after the earthquake. Residents have started to take action on their own because bodies haven't been picked up and the stench is overwhelming. The deceased was a street vendor who was killed when a cement block fell on her, according to those who were around her.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

AT A LOSS: Filiane Lander, 39, right, and Suzette Benjamin, 50, cover their noses as they watch the body of one of their friends being burned where she was killed by falling debris. "I was sitting right there," Lander said, "when it happened. We don't know what to do now. No one has told us. Not only do we not have money to buy food to sell, but we don't even have a place to sit." Many women like them sit on the sidewalks selling goods. Debris had fallen from the building above, killing their friend. Locals set the corpse on fire to try to eliminate the stench, which had become too strong after four days during which no city workers had come to pick up the body.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

WAITING FOR RELIEF: A boy watches a passing helicopter as Haitians line up to receive high-protein biscuits being handed out by the World Food Program with the assistance of United Nations troops.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

HOMELESS: A man holds his sleeping son during another night in a park in Port-au-Prince. Thousands of people are afraid to sleep in their homes, and many have no homes to go to.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

PATROL: An armed security guard patrols in downtown Port-au-Prince, the Haitian capital, to prevent looting in the area where several bank buildings collapsed.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

DAMAGED: A section of downtown Port-au-Prince is among the areas that were heavily damaged.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

ACCIDENTAL: The body of a police officer lies in a Port-au-Prince street. He was accidentally shot by fellow officers who mistook him for a looter.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

LOOTING: Looting continued in Haiti on the third day after the earthquake, although there were more police in downtown Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

DESTROYED: The Port-au-Prince Cathedral was destroyed in the earthquake.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

LOOTERS: A man taking part in the looting of a downtown Port-au-Prince store wears an Obama T-shirt. On the third day after the earthquake some of the police force has started to appear in the streets.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

AID: International aid has started to arrive three days after the earthquake hit Haiti. A team from the World Food Program passes out water containers and purification tablets with the help of United Nations peacekeeping troops in central Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

STANDING GUARD: An armed security guard monitors an area of downtown Port-au-Prince where the national bank collapsed.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

ARRESTED: A Haitian police officer ties up a suspected looter who was carrying a bag of evaporated milk.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

CANDLELIGHT: Thousands of people in Port-au-Prince are still too afraid to sleep in their homes. A family gathers around a candle waiting for the sun to rise on the third night after the quake. They were singing hymns throughout the night.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

RESCUE: A Belgian rescue team pulls 52-year-old Marise Pierre Louis from the rubble of her home in Port-au-Prince where she trapped for three days. International aid has started to arrive three days after the earthquake hit Haiti.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

RELIEF: Dan Woolley, of Compassion International, is rescued from the Hotel Montana, where he spent 65 hours pinned under rubble. Touching his face is Mondesir Luckson, a bellboy who was also trapped in the ruins and with whom he was able to communicate.
(Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

TENT CITY: One of the many tent cities that have sprung up around Port-au-Prince catering to the thousands left homeless after a 7.0 earthquake.
(Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

MAKESHIFT: A young boy peeks out from sheets cobbled together for a makeshift tent in Port-au-Prince. Residents have been making do with whatever they can find.
(Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

STREET SCENE: Haitians argue over goods looted from a store in downtown Port-au-Prince. The woman holds in her top the share she claims.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

STANDING GUARD: Police try to stop looting in downtown Port-au-Prince. People are becoming desperate for food and water and anything they might sell.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

MORGUE: Lionel Michaud mourns the death of his wife, Lormeny Nathalie, and son Christian Michaud, who lie in the courtyard outside a morgue in Port-au-Prince where hundreds of bodies have been brought.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

SEARCHING: A man helps in the effort to rescue Herby Emile, who survived the quake but was trapped after Canape Vert College in Port-au-Prince collapsed. Emile's friends are able to pass him food and water but cannot free him from the rubble.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

MEDICAL ATTENTION: Windhantz Bazim, 8, who suffered a broken leg and other injuries when his house collapsed on him, is carried into a Doctors Without Borders clinic in Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

DETAINED: A man is detained after being accused of looting from a store in downtown Port-au-Prince. Police officers and the store owner beat him in the street.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

GRIM TASK: Men carry a dead relative in a coffin down the street as transportation for many is difficult and gasoline is nearly gone.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

DISTRAUGHT: Women grow distraught as they discover that the body of a relative they had recovered has disappeared. The family sold the coffin they had brought in to another family that had a dead relative nearby.
(Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

VICTIM: The body of a young girl lays on the side of the road two days after the massive earthquake that destroyed the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince.
(Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

BELONGINGS: While some Haitians searched for survivors in the rubble, others packed what was left of their belongings and evacuated Port-au-Prince. By some official estimates, 3 million people were affected by the earthquake, roughly a third of the population of the impoverished Caribbean nation.
(Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

HOPE FOR HAITI: A medic from Hope for Haiti cleans the wounds of an injured girl outside the La Villa Creole hotel in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Petionville.
(Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

FATALITIES: A Hope for Haiti medic tends to a young boy injured in the 7.0-magnitude earthquake that has devastated Port-au-Prince. Planes carrying rescuers and tons of water, food and medical supplies have landed in the Haitian capital from the U.S., China, France and Spain, according to officials and news reports.
(Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

ABLAZE: A fire burns from within a destroyed building in Port-au-Prince. Throughout the capital, structures lay collapsed like giant sandwiches, with remnants showing through.
( Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times )

MEDICAL ATTENTION: Quake victims receive aid at a makeshift hospital in Port-au-Prince.
(Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

WAITING: An earthquake victim awaits further medical help in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
( Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times )

HELPLESS: Men gather outside the Justice Department in Port-au-Prince, where countless victims lay buried. President Obama called the 7.0 quake "cruel and incomprehensible" and promised that the U.S. would help in any way it could.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

PITCHING IN: A woman tries to rescue someone whose voice she heard from benaeath the Department of Justice building, one of many shattered government centers.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

ALIVE: A teacher who was injured when his school collapsed is helped by a stranger outside a hospital.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

CRUSHED:s A car lies beneath a collapsed structure in the Haitian capital. Scientists focus on areas with high seismic standards while ignoring poorer regions, one expert says.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

FEARING AFTERSHOCKS: Afraid of more aftershocks, Haitians rest in the streets of Port-au-Prince.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

FATALITIES: Bodies lie wrapped in sheets in Port-au-Prince, a familiar site in the Haitian capital a day after the earthquake.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)