Opinion
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No freedom fight in Utah

Petroleum IndustryLand ResourcesConservation

The Utah "freedom fighters" aren't content with 2,800 miles of trails open to all-terrain vehicles surrounding Recapture Canyon, a mere 14-mile stretch that contains invaluable Native American ruins. Nor are they content to walk, bicycle or ride the trail on horseback, activities that are permitted. ("Protesters in Utah drive ATVs onto federal land -- but find no showdown," May 10)

No, these people wear the mantle of oppression merely because the federal government's Bureau of Land Management won't allow them to trample an archaeological site with ATVs.

These people are not patriots. They have no cause. They have no legitimate grievance with any government. Their actions amount to nothing more admirable than a child's tantrum.

Greg Seyranian

Redondo Beach

The article frames this fight as being between the citizens and the federal government, which completely misses the main point. The real issue is that local and state officials are trying to take land that belongs to all Americans and use it for destructive purposes such as off-road driving and drilling for oil and gas.

A more accurate way to think of the issue is as a few selfish, disgruntled citizens versus the rest of the American public. Every acre of public land has more than 300 million owners; what happens to it should not be determined by a few thousand.

Pete Aniello

Redlands

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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