Editorial
Grading City Hall: How is L.A.'s city controller doing so far?
Readers React
Opinion Readers React
Readers React

Making Californians serious about cutting water use

To the editor: Instead of trying to set a water-use quota backed up by fines, it would be far easier to restructure the usage charges based on the current tiered schedule. ("California officials admit they have incomplete water usage data," July 26)

For example, if the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power were to double the charges on the second tier and quadruple the charges for any usage above that, it would probably prod more consumers to reduce their water consumption immediately without incurring yet more expenses and delay in its implementation.

American consumers are more sensitive to their pocketbooks than anything else, as evidenced by the inverse correlation between the price of a gallon of gas and the total mileage driven by motorists.

Our water shortage is dire and calls for an immediate solution, not more studies.

John T. Chiu, Newport Beach

..

To the editor: If the state is serious about reducing water usage, a fine place to start would be with the various state agencies and cities.

Mid-afternoon the other day, I took an exit off the 405 Freeway and noticed sprinklers drenching a median made up mostly of weeds. And most of that water was actually landing on asphalt, missing the weeds entirely.

It is kind of hard to take this effort seriously when you have the government absolutely wasting water like this.

Richard Hormel, Los Angeles

..

To the editor: We will never get a major sector of the population to conserve as long as "all you can use" water is included for apartment renters. Landlords have no way to induce tenants to conserve, and there is no motivation for them to do so on their own.

Altruism doesn't seem to work here.

Nancy Loder, Toluca Lake

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
  • The choice: Start World War III, or support the Iran nuclear deal

    To the editor: John Bolton's rush to a radioactive World War III was not palatable even to George W. Bush, the man who took us to war in Iraq and appointed Bolton as ambassador to the United Nations. ("The consequences of a bad deal with Iran," op-ed, July 26)

  • The 'low' average premium increase is nothing to cheer

    To the editor: Covered California Executive Director Peter V. Lee and UC Berkeley health economist James C. Robinson are not convincing as to the success of Obamacare in California. ("Obamacare works in California. Here's why," op-ed, July 27)

  • Local governments are picking up the slack on climate change

    To the editor: When Aaron Renn scolds local communities for challenging climate-destroying fossil fuel development like drilling in the Arctic, he's relaying Big Oil's message: Resistance is futile. ("Local environmental activists don't get to make federal policy," op-ed, July 27)

  • No, that horn from a poached rhino won't cure your hangover

    No, that horn from a poached rhino won't cure your hangover

    To the editor: Regarding your article about the rhino orphanage in South Africa founded to respond to the immense scope of the poaching going on there to obtain horns for purchase by people who consume it for, of all things, a hangover cure: ("After poachers slaughter their mothers, baby rhinos...

  • Utilities need to do their part to help renters save water

    To the editor: Sub-metering apartments for water places the burden of billing on owners, making each one his own mini-utility. We hate that. Why not require utilities to do their job and install individual meters for apartments? But that costs “thousands of dollars per unit,” claims the article....

  • In defense of unaccredited law schools

    To the editor: As a successful graduate of an unaccredited law school, I take exception to your article on the schools' high dropout rates. Not everyone is cut out to become an attorney, just like not everyone is cut out to be a journalist or a doctor. The failures of many do not make the system...

Comments
Loading
79°