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Dear restaurant servers: Stop calling your customers 'you guys'

Dear restaurant servers: Stop calling your customers 'you guys'
A server tends to customers at the Nickel Diner in downtown Los Angeles in 2017. (Los Angeles Times)

To the editor: Natalie Gregory, the writer and comedian who works as a waiter and doesn’t think much of her customers, should forgive classless Angelenos for providing her an income that allows her to pursue her “artistic interests.” Has she considered another line of work more suited to her sensibilities?

Since Gregory chooses to suffer life as a server, she should remember that it is her job. People go to a restaurant for service as well as food. It isn’t a diner’s job to pay her salary; that is the restaurant's responsibility.

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And she should remember not to call her customers “guys” or call eating “working.” We are people and we eat our meals, not work on them. Plus, what’s wrong with asking for dressing on the side or cole slaw instead of French fries? It’s not hard to write that down, nor is it hard on the kitchen.

Waiters have a job to do, so they should do it. If you’re having a bad day, call in sick.

Elaine Morris, Solvang

..

To the editor: My wife and I have great sympathy for servers when we dine out, and I am certain that Gregory would find us the ideal diners. Her essay was well written and amusing and demonstrates her command of English.

I would like to propose that she lead the effort to find an alternative to the annoying “you guys” that most servers seem to use to address their guests.

Kevin Gerlock, Fallbrook

..

To the editor: Is working at as a restaurant server hard? Yes. Are customers sometimes rude? Yes.

Did Gregory’s article do anything to change the perception of millennials as whiny and entitled? No.

Jeff Allison, La Habra Heights

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