ENTERTAINMENT
Golden Globes 2018: Complete list of nominees
Politics

Young people shielded from deportation and allowed to work legally under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program will begin losing their protection next March unless Congress acts before then, the Trump administration announced on Sept. 5.

Congress' top two Democrats announced Wednesday night that a deal had been reached to help so-called Dreamers, but President Trump denied a final agreement was made concerning the young immigrants.

Here's what you need to know:



MexicoProtestsWashington

The fate of 'Dreamers' resonates in Mexico

Activists pray at the wall between Mexico and the U.S. during a protest against the possibility of the deportation of Dreamers included in the DACA program. (Guillermo Arias / AFP/Getty Images)
Activists pray at the wall between Mexico and the U.S. during a protest against the possibility of the deportation of Dreamers included in the DACA program. (Guillermo Arias / AFP/Getty Images)

The fate of the so-called Dreamers has resonated deeply in Mexico, the birthplace of the majority of the estimated 800,000 immigrants who have benefited from the Obama administration program.

Many were brought to the United States as minors by parents or relatives during a boom in illegal immigration before enhanced enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border slowed the illicit movement of Mexican nationals into the United States.

In his State of the Union address on Saturday, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto made an unusual reference to the recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program.

Speaking from the National Palace in Mexico City, the Mexican president declared: “I send affectionate greetings to the young beneficiaries of the administrative measure that protects those who arrived as infants to the United States. To all of you, young dreamers, our great recognition, admiration and solidarity without reservations.”

Mexico has rejected the Trump administration’s insistence that it will pay for a new, multibillion-dollar wall on the U.S. side of the border. The Mexican government, which has a network of 50 consulates in the United States, has said it will do what it can to assist those facing deportation under the Trump administration’s get-tough policies.

But critics in Mexico have long assailed the Mexican government  for not doing enough to help deportees and others trying to adjust to life in Mexico after living for years in the United States. 

Latest updates

Copyright © 2017, Los Angeles Times
EDITION: California | U.S. & World
74°