Arthur Andersen

The start-ups that will help your company avoid becoming the next Uber

The start-ups that will help your company avoid becoming the next Uber

Amy Errett wanted to gauge employee happiness at her e-commerce start-up, but surveys weren’t working. Responses were often vague, unhelpful or, worse, deceitful. And even if she promised anonymity, some workers didn’t trust the process.

“It just never had consistency and objectivity,” said Errett, who runs the 75-person San Francisco e-commerce hair care company Madison Reed.

So she called in outsiders for help.

A new breed of human resources start-ups is cropping up to help companies figure out how their employees feel. By building and licensing software that has the specific purpose of measuring employee engagement, they allow companies to do snap polls, target...

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