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Want to really appreciate your food? A higher price may do the trick
Want to really appreciate your food? A higher price may do the trick

If you could get a $5 lunch for $1, would it taste better? Be a more satisfying lunch? If you chose the bargain, guess again. Price affects consumer satisfaction, and getting a deal doesn’t necessarily make diners like their food better, according to researchers at Cornell University who frequently study human behavior and eating habits. “We were fascinated to find that pricing has little impact on how much one eats, but a huge impact on how you interpret the experience,” Brian Wansink, a professor at Cornell’s Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, said in a statement. Just cutting the price “dramatically affects how customers evaluate and...

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