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Jan Troell
'Last Sentence' gives WWII Swedish editor the last word on the Nazis
'Last Sentence' gives WWII Swedish editor the last word on the Nazis

A few days after Adolf Hitler came to power in Germany in 1933, Torgny Segerstedt, the editor in chief of one of Sweden's major newspapers, wrote a scathing article about Der Führer and the Nazi regime: "To force the politics and press of the entire world to deal with that character, that is unforgivable. Mr Hitler is an insult." (It wasn't the first time Segerstedt ruffled feathers. When Soviet Union leader Vladimir Lenin died in 1924, he described him as a "curse" on the Russian people.) The Nazis were furious with the editorial. Reichsminister Hermann Goering sent a threatening telegram to the paper. Five days later, Segerstedt wrote an even more...

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