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Gangster Al Capone's pearl-handled pistol now displayed at Las Vegas' Mob Museum

Gangster Al Capone's pearl-handled pistol now displayed at Las Vegas' Mob Museum
A Smith & Wesson revolver, customized for Al Capone with pearl grips, is the Mob Museum's newest artifact. It's on loan from the IRS, which confiscated the gun during a 2004 investigation. (The Mob Museum)

Score one for the good guys – and history buffs too. A seized handgun that once belonged to notorious gangster Al Capone is now on display in Las Vegas.

The custom-made, pearl-handled pistol packed by Scarface during the Roaring '20s is the latest artifact to join the collection at the Mob Museum in downtown Las Vegas.

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The Smith & Wesson .38-caliber revolver is on loan from the feds, specifically the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation unit. Chief Richard Weber presented the gun to the museum Sept. 28.

Chief Richard Weber of the IRS Criminal Investigation unit stands beside the case enclosing the revolver once owned by mobster Al Capone.
Chief Richard Weber of the IRS Criminal Investigation unit stands beside the case enclosing the revolver once owned by mobster Al Capone. (The Mob Museum)

Weber's predecessors confiscated the gun in 1928 during Capone's arrest in Miami. The pistol ended up back on the streets, changing hands several times before being forfeited to the IRS during a much later investigation in 2004.

The Mob Museum has an ongoing partnership with IRS agents, including collaborating on an exhibit called "Follow the Money" that opened last year.

"While we continue to follow the money trail as we did in the days when we brought Al Capone to justice, we are now following the money in the cyber world," Weber said in remarks prepared for the gun's presentation to the museum.

"Scarface" Al Capone (left) is one of the key figures in the museum's "Made Men" exhibit, which shares the stories of a century of American gangsters.
"Scarface" Al Capone (left) is one of the key figures in the museum's "Made Men" exhibit, which shares the stories of a century of American gangsters. (The Mob Museum)

Capone features prominently in the museum's "100 Years of Made Men" display. As the exhibit's Web page notes, the many gangsters' crimes "range from bootlegging to betting, drug trafficking to murder."

The Mob Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tickets cost $23.95 for adults and $13.95 for youth ages 11 to 17. Kids 10 and younger are admitted free.

Info: The Mob Museum, (702) 229-2734

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