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Four simple road trip games

A long road trip can seem endless in silence, especially if you're passing through familiar or dull roads. If you're traveling in a group, pass the time by playing a road trip game. Here are four easy games to play. 

Would You Rather?

This game involves asking your car companions to choose between two comparably desirable or undesirable possibilities. For example: Would you rather attend the Sochi Olympics or the 2014 World Cup in Brazil? The point of this game is to ask questions that reveal insights about the people around you. 

20 Questions

In this game, one person thinks of an object that the others have to guess. Guessers get to ask 20 yes or no questions to help them deduce the object. You might ask if the object is living or inanimate, or if it is larger than a basketball. Use your imagination when choosing something to guess, but make sure it's an object most people are familiar with. Also make sure to keep track of how many questions have been asked if you're answering them. 

Two Truths and a Lie

In Two Truths and a Lie, players take turns telling two facts and a lie about themselves. If it's your turn, your objective is to pick facts about yourself that no one else would know or suspect. The lie should be something you can tell without smiling or stumbling over your words. If it's not your turn, your job is to guess the lie.


In this simplified version, one player thinks of a notable person, real or fictional, dead or alive. The player has to reveal the first letter of that person's name, usually his or her last name. The other players have to guess the person's identity by asking yes or no questions. For instance, "Is this person alive?" If you're picking a person for others to guess, choose someone as well known as Sandro Botticelli, the "Birth of Venus" artist the game is named after. You should also be familiar enough with the person to answer any reasonable questions about him or her. 

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