Travel

World Cup 2014: The most fanatical soccer cities in the world

White-sand beaches, amazing mountains, the world's largest rain forest, cosmopolitan cities, boffo music, wild night life and plenty of gorgeous eye candy — no wonder 600,000 international travelers will find Brazil a great destination for the month-long 2014 FIFA World Cup soccer championship, which begins June 12. If you're not there for the soccer, you'll still find plenty to entertain yourself; for a rundown, see latimes.com/brazilworldcup. While teams from 32 countries compete in a dozen cities across Brazil, culminating in the championship match in Rio de Janeiro on July 13, fans around the world will cheer from their own soccer-crazed towns. We've selected a few of the world's most-fanatical soccer cities so you can applaud or cry with the locals — or enjoy some crowd-free tourism while their eyes are elsewhere.

--April Orcutt

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  • World Cup 2014: Marseille, France has a revolutionary spirit
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