BooksJacket Copy

IMPAC Dublin Award shortlist includes three Americans, Murakami

AuthorsLiteratureArts and Culture

The IMPAC Dublin Literary Award announced its shortlist for 2013 on Tuesday, and a refreshingly diverse group it is, with five novels in translation -- from Japan, Iceland, Norway, the Netherlands, and France -- listed along with one British, one Irish and three American novels.  The prize, which carries a pot of more than $150,000, is the most valuable one in the world.

Shortlisted titles this year include Karen Russell's "Swamplandia" (which was also a finalist for the Pulitzer last year), "The Tragedy of Arthur" by Arthur Phillips, "The Buddha in the Attic" by Julie Otsuka and "1Q84" by Haruki Murakami. 

"This is the highest number of books in translation on the shortlist since the award began," said Margaret Hayes, Dublin City Librarian and one of the organizers of the award. "There is something here for everyone."  Should a work in translation win, the author will receive three-fourths of the prize money, with the translator receiving one-fourth. 

Besides the higher-than-usual international turnout, there are also two first novels -- "City of Bohane" by Irishman Kevin Barry and "The Faster I Walk, the Smaller I am" by Kjersti Skomsvold of Norway -- and two previous IMPAC winners -- Michel Houellebecq, who is nominated for "The Map and the Territory" and won in 2002 for his novel "Atomised," as well as Andrew Miller, now listed for his novel "Pure," who won in 1999 for "Ingenious Pain."

The diversity of the list is perhaps not surprising: The 10 shortlisted books were selected by public libraries in countries as far flung as Estonia, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, Russia, South Africa, Spain, the Netherlands and the United States.  An international judging panel will select a winner, to be announced June 6. 

ALSO:

Emily and Herman and Lillian and Dash and ...

Julia Sweeney on her new book and life as a mom

Only in death will Margaret Thatcher speak -- in an authorized bio

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
AuthorsLiteratureArts and Culture
  • Browsing for books around the world
    Browsing for books around the world

    Despite the dire predictions of recent years, print books refuse to die. Here's a collection of photos of people browsing bookstores, market stalls and book fairs around the world -- everyone's looking for something to read, without an e-book in sight.

  • Pablo Neruda's grave is opened in inquiry into the poet's death
    Pablo Neruda's grave is opened in inquiry into the poet's death

    The body of Nobel Prize-winning poet Pablo Neruda is being exhumed from his tomb in Chile on Monday morning in an attempt to discover whether he was poisoned by the regime of General Augusto Pinochet.

  • To write and die in L.A.
    To write and die in L.A.

    To pay tribute to London's literary dead, tourists go to Highgate Cemetery. In Paris, it's Père Lachaise. But in Los Angeles, boot up the GPS — our writerly dead authors are buried all over town, befitting L.A. sprawl.

  • 'Elsa Schiaparelli': Fashion designer too elusive for words
    'Elsa Schiaparelli': Fashion designer too elusive for words

    Among the many remarkable aspects of designer Elsa Schiaparelli's remarkable life — she became a world-famous couturier without knowing how to sew, collaborated on sartorial projects with Surrealists like Salvador Dali and Jean Cocteau, raised her daughter alone at a time when this...

  • Joyce Carol Oates sets Twitter ablaze with street harassment tweets
    Joyce Carol Oates sets Twitter ablaze with street harassment tweets

    Joyce Carol Oates, bestselling novelist, massively prolific writer and Princeton professor, has an official Twitter account with more than 100,000 followers. On Thursday, she shared with them her thoughts on street harassment, part of a conversation started by a viral video.

  • A black teen is shot in Kekla Magoon's 'How It Went Down'
    A black teen is shot in Kekla Magoon's 'How It Went Down'

    Kekla Magoon's riveting postmortem account of a tragic shooting is as familiar a scenario in contemporary urban YA fiction as it has been in recent national headlines. "How It Went Down" opens seconds after a white bystander, Jack Franklin, guns down African American teen Tariq...

Comments
Loading