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Obama advisor David Axelrod to publish Washington memoir

David Axelrod, former senior advisor to President Obama, is joining the list of  one-time Obama administration officials who will be penning memoirs next year, Penguin Press has announced.

Other Obama administration officials with books on the way include former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton and former Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner.

Axelrod's book is scheduled for a fall 2014 release.

"Over the past 30 years as a journalist, political consultant and senior advisor to the President, David Axelrod has had a front-row seat to our political process at every level," Penguin Press editor-in-chief Ann Godoff said in a statement, "His idealism is infectious and his storytelling gifts are prodigious."

The memoir will cover Axelrod's professional life, which began as a columnist for the Chicago Tribune, through his years as a political strategist - -which included serving as a political advisor for President Clinton -- his two-decade-long friendship with the Obamas, and the successful campaigns he helped run for the President in 2008 and 2012. 

"From the day I sat on a mailbox as an awestruck 5-year old, watching John F. Kennedy inspire and challenge my neighbors, to the final, emotional rally of Barack Obama's political career, I have taken an extraordinary journey, filled with rich history and unforgettable characters," Axelrod said.

Although it is possible that Obama's political career has a few more rallies in it yet.

The 58-year-old Axelrod recently joined NBC News as a senior political analyst, and it's not clear that the book signals an interest in a future political career. However, as the Daily News reminds us, when news of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's forthcoming memoir broke, it was Axelrod who tweeted that "when politicians write memoirs, they're generally thinking ahead."

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Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
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