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Seecrypt encrypted messaging app coming to BlackBerry, Windows Phone

BlackBerryEdward SnowdenApple iOSMac OSNational Security Agency

Seecrypt, an encrypted communication app, will be available for BlackBerry 10 and Windows Phone users before the end of the year, the app developer said.

The South Africa-based company rose to prominence following Edward Snowden's National Security Agency-related leaks. The company launched the Seecrypt app months before Snowden stole national headlines. That created a perfect market for Seecrypt, which launched in April for Android and Apple iOS, as many consumers became worried about the privacy of their communication.

Seecrypt allows users to send encrypted messages and make encrypted voice calls with others who also use the app. The encryption technology, which keeps hackers and spy agencies from deciphering conversations, is military grade, the company said.

The company lets users try the app free for the first three months. After that, it charges users $3 per month for the service, which lets users make unlimited calls and send unlimited messages. The app can also be used to communicate with fellow users even if they are in other countries.

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Those features will be expanded to include encrypted voice mail, group chats and conference calls before the year's end. Seecrypt said users will also be able to send encrypted messages with attachments included, such as photos and videos.

Besides BlackBerry and Windows Phone, Seecrypt said it will also launch a desktop app that will allow users to send messages, attachments and make calls from their computers.

Even though most consumers have antivirus programs, firewalls and other protections for their computers, forms of communication such as voice, email and text messages remain "completely insecure," said Seecrypt Chief Executive Mornay Walters. "And Seecrypt aims to address that need for people."

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Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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BlackBerryEdward SnowdenApple iOSMac OSNational Security Agency
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