Bulldoze first, apologize later: a true L.A. landmark

Architect Thom Mayne, new owner of the late Ray Bradbury’s home, says he plans to build a wall on the property that will pay tribute to the writer. (Byron Espinoza)

It was beginning to feel like a demolition derby.

On Tuesday, word started to spread that the canary-yellow 1937 house in Cheviot Hills where the writer Ray Bradbury lived for more than 50 years was being knocked down.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

Advertisement

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

Advertisement

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

Advertisement

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

Advertisement

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

Advertisement

The director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University's Indianapolis campus, Jonathan Eller, supported Mayne's decision to knock down the old house and build a new one.

Advertisement
Advertisement

You've reached your monthly free article limit.

Get Unlimited Digital Access

4 weeks for only 99¢
Subscribe Now

Cancel Anytime

Already have digital access? Log in

Log out

Print subscriber? Activate digital access