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Magic glasses for the deaf! NBC's challenges. More 'Idol' drama.

After the coffee. Before packing for almost two weeks in New York.

The Skinny: I'm catching up on "Rectify," the new drama on Sundance. It is slow going but I'm told it is worth the effort. I just want to know how long Daniel is a cross between Karl Childers and Forrest Gump? Tuesday's news includes a story about some new glasses that will make it easier for the deaf to enjoy movies and a look at NBC's challenges heading into upfront week. Also, today I tested out emailing an alert with a link when the Morning Fix went live. Hope those of you that got it used it and for those who want it, send me a note.

Daily Dose: Netflix has decided not to send out preview episodes of "Arrested Development" for critics to screen and review in advance of the cult comedy's much-anticipated return at the end of the month. A Netflix spokeswoman said, "Given that these episodes are so interwoven, it would make most sense to send them all and not have to isolate a selection for review, but we just won't make some deadlines, so trying to keep it fair for all." That probably won't sit well with critics who figure they can probably still judge from a few episodes whether "Arrested Development" recaptures the magic from its days on Fox.

Magic glasses. Regal Entertainment, the nation's largest movie theater chain, is looking to make it easier for the deaf to enjoy going to the movies. Regal will soon offer hearing-impaired viewers special glasses that provide subtitles in the lenses. The closed-captioning is only visible to those wearing the glasses. For Regal senior executive Raymond Smith, this has been a passion project as his son Ryan is deaf. The Los Angeles Times on how Regal and Sony teamed up to create closed-captioning glasses.

PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments

Wait, now I have to pay for that goofy cat video? Next time you click on a video on YouTube, you could be asked to cough up some cash. The Google-owned online video site is considering charging subscription fees for some content. Fear not, the bulk of YouTube content will remain free (and probably pirated). More on YouTube's subscription plans from the Financial Times.

A few holes to fill. A season that started out with such promise is going down in flames for NBC. "Revolution" lost its momentum and most of the new comedies fizzled. Next week the network will unveil its new fall schedule to advertisers including a comedy starring Michael J. Fox which hopefully will be named something more creative than "The Michael J. Fox Show." A look at NBC from Vulture.

A lawsuit to end lawsuits. CBS has threatened to sue Aereo, the company that distributes broadcast signals via the Internet, in any city in which the startup tries to launch. Now Aereo has filed a suit in federal court in New York attempting to keep the legal fight in the Empire State. Aereo has already won a few battles there. The latest chapter of Aereo vs. broadcasters from the Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times.

Rushing out the door? Rush Limbaugh is considering moving his show off of radio stations owned by Cumulus Media. According to Politico, Limbaugh is irked that Cumulus keeps blaming its revenue problems on skittish advertisers steering clear of the talk show's program. While some advertisers do stay away from Limbaugh's show, odds are he'll have no problem landing other stations should he walk from Cumulus.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: The lure of Southern drawls on film

Can't they get along? More drama on Fox's "American Idol" as Nicki Minaj continues to take shots at her fellow judge Mariah Carey. But are Minaj and Fox really just trying to get attention for the show, which has seen its ratings tumble? That's what Carey's husband Nick Cannon thinks. Remember when this was a wholesome show about wannabe stars trying to win a singing contest? The latest on the drama at "American Idol" from Deadline Hollywood. Wake me when its over.

Inside the Los Angeles Times: David Lazarus has a wish list for the next chairman of the Federal Communciations Commission.

Follow me on Twitter and unfollow every other media reporter! @JBFlint.

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