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Debbie Reynolds to receive SAG Life Achievement Award

Debbie Reynolds will receive the 51st SAG Life Achievement Award
Actress, singer and dancer Debbie Reynolds is named recipient of Screen Actors Guild's Life Achievement Award

Actress, singer and dancer Debbie Reynolds has been named the recipient of the 51st SAG Life Achievement Award for her career and humanitarian accomplishments.

Reynolds, a 66-year veteran of show business, will receive the honor at the 21st Screen Actors Guild Awards on Jan. 25. The awards will be broadcast live on TNT and TBS.

In a statement, SAG-AFTRA President Ken Howard described Reynolds as "a tremendously talented performer with a diverse body of screen and stage work, live performances and several hit records. Her generous spirit and unforgettable performances have entertained audiences across the globe, moving us all from laughter to tears and back again."

An Oscar, Emmy, Tony and Golden Globe nominee, Reynolds has starred in more than 50 movies, two Broadway shows and two television series; the 82-year-old performer has made dozens of TV, cabaret and concert appearances.

Born in El Paso, Texas, Reynolds moved with her family to Burbank as teen and caught the eye of Hollywood talent scouts. She made her screen debut in the 1950 musical "The Daughter of Rosie O'Grady" and would go on to star in such movies as "Singin' in the Rain," "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" (for which she earned an Academy Award nomination), "How the West Was Won," "Tammy and the Bachelor," "The Pleasure of His Company," "Divorce American Style" and "How Sweet It Is."

On TV, Reynolds received a 1970 Golden Globe nomination for "The Debbie Reynolds Show," headlined ABC's "Aloha Paradise" in 1981 and earned a 2000 Emmy nomination for her recurring role on "Will & Grace."

Reynolds is also an active philanthropist and has a passion for collecting and preserving Hollywood memorabilia.

Recipients of the SAG Life Achievement Award include Rita Moreno last year, Dick Van Dyke in 2012 and Mary Tyler Moore in 2011.

Follow @ogettell on Twitter for movie news.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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