ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION

Mary McNamara's Pulitzer-winning columns

Mary McNamara is a television critic for the Los Angeles Times. She won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for criticism. She was a finalist for the same award in 2013 and 2014. Below are the columns that won the prize.

Read more of her most recent work >>

  • Fresh spate of sexism, violence ominously familiar

    Fresh spate of sexism, violence ominously familiar

    It's a long way from "Lysistrata" but in recent weeks, more than 2,400 years since Aristophanes gave voice to female discontent in a patriarchal society, the gender wars erupted once again in ways both refreshingly modern and disquietingly familiar. Discontent with society's still-narrow female...

  • Binge watching, that great American pastime, can also be good medicine

    Binge watching, that great American pastime, can also be good medicine

    A steady diet of television helped a teen cope with back surgery and the news that followed. Yes, too much TV might be bad for sedentary Americans, but it also can do a body good.

  • 'Orange Is the New Black' Emmy nods a win for women

    'Orange Is the New Black' Emmy nods a win for women

    In this year's Emmy race, "Orange Is the New Black" embodies the most important change in television in recent years. No, not Netflix. Women. "Orange," with multiple-nominee "House of Cards," does give Netflix an Atlas-like stance over the television landscape; HBO is the only other outlet with...

  • Joan Rivers, an unstoppable comic force to the end

    Joan Rivers, an unstoppable comic force to the end

    Just as we long suspected, the only thing that could stop Joan Rivers was death. Abrasive, raunchy, self-immolating and often unapologetically offensive, Rivers changed comedy, courted controversy, survived catastrophe and refused to give up or give in, even when either of those might have seemed...

  • The sun sets on Stephen Colbert's sterling satire

    The sun sets on Stephen Colbert's sterling satire

    In 2006, Stephen Colbert performed at the White House correspondent's dinner. For almost 25 uncomfortably hilarious and immediately divisive minutes, Colbert performed as the titular character of his Comedy Central show, damning virtually all the attendees, including then-President George W. Bush,...

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