Youth sports resources

Many local and national organizations aim to improve youth sports culture through the education of coaches and parents and the training of sports officials. A number of them also offer youth sports programs.

•  National Assn. for Sport and Physical Education: The largest of the five national associations that make up the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, the organization conducts research, creates standards and offers programs to improve the quality of physical education, sport and physical activity programs in a variety of settings. http://www.aahperd.org/naspe or (703) 476-3400.

•  Maine Center for Sport and Coaching: Part of the University of Maine, the center provides professional development to coaches and helps implement Sports Done Right, a community-based program that seeks to improve youth sports based on seven core principles that describe youth sports programs that promote health. http://www.sportsdonerightmaine.org or (866) 767-8540.

•  Positive Coaching Alliance: Based at Stanford University, the organization promotes coaching methods that help children learn life lessons through sports. It offers training workshops for coaches, parents and leaders of youth sports programs. http://www.positivecoach.org or (866) 725-0024.

•  National Athletic Trainers' Assn.: The organization of certified trainers seeks to enhance the quality of healthcare provided by trainers. The group also offers advice and information on healthful sports training for children and youth. http://www.nata.org or (214) 637-6282.

•  National Alliance for Youth Sports: The organization promotes positive and safe sports activities for children and offers programs and services to improve the skills of volunteers, professionals, parents and players involved in youth sports. http://www.nays.org or (800) 688-KIDS.

•  Institute for the Study of Youth Sports: The institute at Michigan State University conducts scientific research on youth sports and provides information on ways to create positive youth sports programs. ed-web3.educ.msu.edu/ysi or (517) 353-6689.

•  Center for the Study of Sport in Society: The Northeastern University group studies how sports can create social change by bridging cultural gaps and promoting sportsmanship. It studies how to achieve a balance between athletics and academics in high school and college sports, and promotes youth physical activity. http://www.sportinsociety.org or (617) 373-4025.

•  National Institute for Sports Reform: The coalition of experts in fitness, youth education and sports seeks to promote change in U.S. sports culture and advocates for sports reform. http://www.nisr.org .

•  Amateur Athletic Foundation of Los Angeles: Founded with surplus funds from the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, the private organization operates a sports research library and funds a variety of youth sports programs in Los Angeles aimed at providing positive sports opportunities for kids of all abilities. http://www.aafla.org or (323) 730-4600.

— Shari Roan

Copyright © 2017, Los Angeles Times
EDITION: California | U.S. & World
69°