Jerry Hirsch

Writer

A third-generation Angeleno, Jerry Hirsch covered the automotive industry for the Los Angeles Times. He wrote frequently about consumer and safety issues in the car business and the relationship between the auto industry and the state and national economies. He has a master’s degree from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. He left The Times in 2015. 

Recent Articles

  • VW cheating scandal prompts EPA to road-test all diesels

    VW cheating scandal prompts EPA to road-test all diesels

    Working with regulators in California and Canada, the Environmental Protection Agency will retest the emissions from every type of diesel passenger car in the U.S..The move comes in reaction to revelations that Volkswagen used sophisticated software to cheat on pollution tests on 482,000 diesel...

  • What you need to know about the Volkswagen emissions-rigging scandal

    What you need to know about the Volkswagen emissions-rigging scandal

    Volkswagen's emissions cheating scandal has shaken the auto industry on both sides of the Atlantic, displacing the company's chief executive and sparking investigations in the U.S. and Europe. The scheme was discovered by U.S. and California environmental regulators in 482,000 vehicles with VW's...

  • U.S. taxpayers duped into shelling out $51 million in green subsidies for 'clean' VW vehicles

    U.S. taxpayers duped into shelling out $51 million in green subsidies for 'clean' VW vehicles

    The federal government paid out as much as $51 million in green car subsidies for Volkswagen diesel vehicles based on falsified pollution test results, according to a Times analysis of the federal incentives. On Friday, federal and state regulators said the German automaker used software in 482,000...

  • VW shares plunge as emissions cheating threatens U.S. sales

    VW shares plunge as emissions cheating threatens U.S. sales

    Volkswagen shares tumbled almost 20% Monday, a day after the company's chief executive apologized for having “broken the trust” of its customers for evading U.S. emissions regulations. On Friday, federal and state regulators said the German automaker used software in 482,000 of its diesel vehicles...

  • VW cheated on U.S. pollution tests for 'clean diesels'

    VW cheated on U.S. pollution tests for 'clean diesels'

    Volkswagen called them “clean diesels,” branding them as the fun-to-drive alternatives to hybrids as it dominated the U.S. market for the engine technology.Turns out the increasingly eco-conscious buyers of the sporty German cars have been unwittingly pumping smog into the air — because of software...

  • Prosecutors, not regulators, are the new enforcers of automotive safety

    Prosecutors, not regulators, are the new enforcers of automotive safety

    General Motors' agreement Thursday to pay a $900-million fine for failing to recall defective cars illustrates the new playbook for holding automakers accountable for safety.Traditional regulators have outsourced the heavy lifting to federal prosecutors, who brandish criminal charges as leverage...

  • Honda shows off reborn Civic

    Honda shows off reborn Civic

    Eager to restore luster and add youthful pizazz to its bestselling sedan, Honda on Wednesday night took up residency in YouTube Studios in West Los Angeles to unveil the 2016 Civic.Scheduled to hit showrooms in the coming weeks, the 10th-generation of the four-seater is sportier and sleeker than...

  • Hackers can now hitch a ride on car computers

    Hackers can now hitch a ride on car computers

    As transportation evolves from mechanical to digital, hackers are following the computers into cars. Just about any new car can be hacked — some even driven by remote control — as automakers depend more on software and wireless connections. Vehicle vulnerability may only grow as cars become their...

EDITION: California | U.S. & World
62°