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Today: 'Awful but Lawful.' El Chapo's Wife Talks.

I'm Davan Maharaj, editor of the Los Angeles Times. Here are some story lines I don't want you to miss today.

TOP STORIES

2,000 Police Shootings, Zero Convictions

In more than 2,000 Southern California police shootings since 2004, only one on-duty officer has been charged with a crime, a Times examination of district attorney files, coroner reports and court records shows. And that officer, in San Bernardino County, was acquitted by a jury. Read on to see how the law provides "huge cover for the police in these situations," as one former district attorney says, and why he calls some on-duty police shootings "awful but lawful."

El Chapo's Wife Speaks Out

Emma Coronel Aispuro has never before spoken publicly about her eight years of marriage to Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, the notorious leader of the Sinaloa drug cartel. Now she has a message: Her husband's life is in danger. "They want to make him pay for his escape," she says. The 26-year-old former beauty queen has a lot more to say -- about how she met El Chapo, his life on the run and their two children -- in this rare interview.

Shut It All Down? Not So Easy

During the gas leak at Southern California Gas Co.'s huge Aliso Canyon storage facility, protestors held signs that read "Shut. It. All. Down." Now that the leak has stopped, should the facility be closed for good? The answer to that is complicated. As many as 39 of the site's 115 wells need upgrading, but it stores gas for most of SoCal Gas' customers. "The whole L.A. area is dependent on one natural gas facility," said U.S. Rep. Brad Sherman. "That's why I can't say shut it down."

Clinton's Worries About Bernie and the Benjamins

Hillary Clinton fended off Bernie Sanders in Nevada, but it's still very much a two-person race. At this point, one of the last things she should be worried about is money. So much for those best-laid plans. The Sanders money machine, based on small donations, is sweeping up millions more lately. As one insider said of Clinton: "There are only so many people in Hollywood with $2,700 to give. Eventually you burn through them." Read on to see how her campaign is trying to adjust. 

So Bad, You Have to Watch

An Anglo candidate who speaks better Spanish than his two Latino rivals. A grandfather who's winning the youth vote. Then there's Donald Trump, who gets close to "threatening to deny visas to anyone who's ever eaten a falafel." See why our columnist Steve Lopez says the presidential race is so awful you can't look away

Let's Roll the Dice Again in Nevada

On Tuesday, it's the Republicans' turn to caucus in the Silver State. Ted Cruz went to a sports bar in Pahrump to drum up support in rural areas angered over federal lands. Marco Rubio is aiming for the Mormon vote. And Donald Trump will be riding his popularity over illegal immigration and economic unrest at a rally in an arena sometimes used for bull-riding. Here's what they hope to gain in a post-Jeb! world.

The Killer Drone Club

Nigeria has become the latest to join a small but fast-growing club: countries using armed drones for targeted killing by remote control. Though the U.S. is the most prolific user of drones, it has also tried to keep a lid on spreading them around. So what is a head of state with killer drone ambitions to do? Well, China is open for business.  

OUR MUST-READS FROM THE WEEKEND

-- An Apple attorney says unlocking a San Bernardino shooter's iPhone would open a "Pandora's box."

-- Airstrikes are cutting into Islamic State's cash supply, the U.S. says.

-- Ransom payoffs to unlock malware from "electronic stickups" are troubling to law enforcement.

-- A new, fast-growing force in Mexican drug trafficking reaches Tijuana.

-- Remembering Harper Lee, author of the classic novel "To Kill a Mockingbird."

-- These quilts with messages about gun violence and racial injustice aim to discomfort.

-- In her series "Make 'Em All Mexican," artist Linda Vallejo imagines #OscarsSoBrown

-- Netflix's "Fuller House" revives the TV family sitcom "Full House" with a few twists and updates.

CALIFORNIA

-- Labor and business groups in L.A. are united against one housing measure and divided by another.

-- For one San Bernardino shooting victim, the hardest part of recovery is fully conveying her gratitude

-- Why Orange County police departments have trouble recruiting Vietnamese American officers.

-- George Skelton: For once, anti-tax rebels are mute about a levy hike.

NATION-WORLD 

-- An Uber driver was arrested after a seven-hour Kalamazoo shooting rampage that left six dead.

-- John F. Kerry says Syria is close to a cease-fire, but bombings claim dozens of lives.

-- The FBI director told people to "take a deep breath" about the Apple debate over security. 

-- From Beijing: I knew the bad air was killing me slowly. But is it making me fat too?

-- A Sikh soldier's climb to the Canadian Cabinet.

HOLLYWOOD AND THE ARTS 

-- Mary McNamara: Here's how Trump and Clinton are ripping up Hollywood's presidential script.

-- In "Better Call Saul," "Breaking Bad's" creators have another success on their hands.

-- How foreign directors are flipping the script on Hollywood story ideas.

-- Harper Lee's and Umberto Eco's legacies continue, unexpectedly, on the big screen.

-- The Oscar-nominated film "Mustang," set in Turkey and financed in France, has a global girl-power message.

BUSINESS 

-- Tech stocks defy investor predictions of a bubble about to pop.

-- Tristan Walker's Bevel is making shaving better for men of color.

SPORTS

-- Golfer Bubba Watson wins the Northern Trust Open after passing a kidney stone at the start of the week.

-- Denny Hamlin won the Daytona 500 by 0.010 seconds, the closest margin in the race's history.

WHAT OUR EDITORS ARE READING

-- The shocking statistics of food waste and how "ugly" fruits and vegetables could help end world hunger. (National Geographic)

-- A young woman talks about going from the Amish community to the modern world of technology. (The Atlantic)

-- A look at infant names in Britain inspired by World War I battles. Most popular: Verdun. (National Archives)

ONLY IN L.A. 

Gargoyles on the front gate. Black-accented bedrooms. A decorative child-sized coffin. When guitarist Dave Navarro decided to list his Hancock Park house, all of these touches had to go, so that it was easier for potential buyers to envision themselves living there. See the before and after pictures of how the property was “de-gothed” to the tune of $8,000. 

Please send comments and ideas to Davan Maharaj.

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