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Dystopias are fine in fiction, but do you really want to live in one?

Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump cheer at a campaign rally Oct. 10 in Ambridge, Pa. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)
Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump cheer at a campaign rally Oct. 10 in Ambridge, Pa. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

Just a few days until the election, and a writer’s thoughts naturally turn to dystopias.

Yes, dystopias — those stories where everything has gone to hell, hopefully in a compulsively readable way. Science-fiction is the home genre of dystopian literature, and any knowledgeable student of the form can lay out dystopias like a car salesman can talk up his floor models.

Looking for classic dystopia? Here’s “1984” by George Orwell. Want something newer? Take a gander at “The Windup Girl” by Paolo Bacigalupi. One for the kids? Everyone loves Suzanne Collins’ “The Hunger Games.”

Want zombies? Mira Grant’s “Feed” series is right up your alley. A religious dystopia? Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” is calling to you. America on the rocks in a pseudo-historical dystopia? Philip K. Dick’s “The Man in the High Castle” is just the ticket. Classy dystopia? Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road” won a Pulitzer, my friend.

All priced to move! All ready to drive off the lot! What will it take for me to get you in one of these imaginings of a world gone horrifyingly wrong?

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