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Is Putin trying to hurt other countries or his with food sanctions?

Russian official says the country is likely to restrict meat, vegetables but not wine
Russia produces only a little more than half of the food it consumes

Russia hasn’t been buying nearly half of its food from abroad because it wants to be nice to foreign countries. It does so because it needs the food; it doesn’t grow enough to feed its own population.

So, although farmers in the United States and the European Union might miss out on some expected sales, it would appear that Russian President Vladimir Putin is inflicting more pain on his own people than on anyone else with the decree he signed Wednesday prohibiting or limiting the import of some farm products from countries that impose economic sanctions against Russia.

According to a report by Reuters, the new sanctions are most likely to affect such staples as vegetables, fruit, meat and dairy products.

So what’s left to import? Wine, of course, according to a government official.

Way to run an unhealthy country. Ditch the broccoli, bring on the Malbec. 

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Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
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