Opinion Readers React
Readers React

For water solutions, ask the experts, not the politicians

To the editor: Here we go again. The Chamber of Commerce wants to build more storage (dams), as if we will have more available water. It wants desalination of seawater but doesn't say where the electricity to operate the plants would come from or where the removed salt should go. ("Biggest dam project in San Diego County history is complete," July 16)

I have a suggestion: Let's get teams from universities, the water agencies, environmental representatives and other appropriate people to list all the possible options. Then complete a life-cycle analysis and determine all the costs and benefits for each option, and produce a report in lay language on all the options, impacts and costs. Then decide which ones to put to the public in a bond issue.

Having the Legislature craft a bond issue to put before voters will do little except give the state more pork projects. We really need to think before acting.

Michael Miller, West Covina

..

To the editor: Why does it seem to be the sole responsibility of residents to conserve water? What about office buildings, restaurants, hotels, civic centers, libraries and other public places?

Everyone — residents, business and government — joined in on saving electricity by changing the wasteful bulbs in light fixtures and traffic signals. It's time to share the responsibility with saving water.

Julie Bixby, Huntington Beach

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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