Editorial
Join our live discussion Wed. at 12 p.m. PDT on what L.A. can learn from Ferguson
OpinionTop of the Ticket

Republican leaders let Rush Limbaugh dominate their party

PoliticsElectionsRush LimbaughJobs and WorkplaceRadioEntertainmentMitt Romney

George Will, one of the last lions of the right wing whose conservatism is a philosophy rather than a pathology, has heaped scorn on Republican leaders for their cowardly obeisance to Rush Limbaugh.

Sunday morning on ABC’s "This Week," Will said straight out that "Republican leaders are afraid of Rush Limbaugh." Last week, Limbaugh infamously characterized Sandra Fluke, a 30-year-old Georgetown University law student, as a "slut" and a "prostitute" who should provide the world with videos of herself having sex because she supports birth control coverage in employee insurance plans. Will said the tepid disapproval of Limbaugh’s words expressed by GOP presidential candidates and congressional leaders demonstrates just how much they are scared of the king of hot-talk radio.

"[House Speaker John] Boehner comes out and says Rush’s language was inappropriate," Will said. "Using the salad fork for your entree, that’s inappropriate. Not this stuff."

Commenting on Limbaugh’s tirade, Mitt Romney timidly observed that "slut" and "prostitute" were not necessarily the words he would have chosen, as if Limbaugh were simply in need of a thesaurus.

Rick Santorum called Limbaugh's comments "absurd," but seemed to give Rush a pass since he is an entertainer whose job it is to be absurd.

Newt Gingrich simply took the Limbaugh flap as one more opportunity to denounce the "liberal media."

To their credit, Ron Paul and John McCain risked the wrath of Limbaugh’s dittohead legion by condemning his comments. But too many other Republicans were unwilling to speak out against the man who has set himself up as the arbiter of who is and who is not sufficiently conservative to be a credible member of the Republican Party.

As Will noted, the would-be leaders of the GOP and of the free world talk boldly about bombing Iran, but they cower in the broad shadow of the "Great Gasbag."

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
PoliticsElectionsRush LimbaughJobs and WorkplaceRadioEntertainmentMitt Romney
  • Rush Limbaugh has so much more to apologize for
    Rush Limbaugh has so much more to apologize for

    Rush Limbaugh’s lame apology to Sandra Fluke does not even come close to getting him off the hook. He needs to apologize to America for pushing political discourse to the level of drunk good ol’ boys shouting crude epithets in a topless bar. 

  • Rick Santorum slams JFK, emulates Pat Robertson
    Rick Santorum slams JFK, emulates Pat Robertson

    Rick Santorum says JFK’s belief in the separation of church and state makes him want to throw up -- more evidence that he is the most socially conservative candidate to seek the Republican presidential nomination since televangelist Pat Robertson made his run in 1988.

  • How to protect celebrities from paparazzi drones
    How to protect celebrities from paparazzi drones

    California was one of many states that strengthened its privacy laws after the shocking death of Princess Diana, who was fleeing paparazzi when her car crashed in a Paris tunnel in 1997. Since then, lawmakers have proposed a seemingly endless series of additions and tweaks to California...

  • Destruction of Syrian chemical weapons shows the U.S. may know what it's doing after all
    Destruction of Syrian chemical weapons shows the U.S. may know what it's doing after all

    Disparate, simultaneous crises around the world have put the Obama administration's foreign policy on trial in recent weeks. The forward march of Islamic State insurgents in Iraq has led to renewed military action in the very country the president so vehemently sought to leave when he...

  • Clean skid row's streets, but then house the homeless
    Clean skid row's streets, but then house the homeless

    The organizers of Operation Healthy Streets, a newly revamped version of an existing Los Angeles city program, vow that filthy skid row streets will be scoured every other month (and spot-cleaned in between) and that city and county outreach workers will be dispatched on a more regular basis...

  • How to boost voter turnout in L.A. -- and it isn't offering prizes
    How to boost voter turnout in L.A. -- and it isn't offering prizes

    In a wondrous proposal that says more about the decline of civilization than its authors surely intended, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission has come up with a way to boost voter turnout in L.A. city elections: Make voters eligible for cash prizes. The recommendation may fail to persuade the...

  • L.A's water ruler, DWP chief Marcie Edwards, on keeping the city hydrated
    L.A's water ruler, DWP chief Marcie Edwards, on keeping the city hydrated

    The Department of Water and Power began 107 years ago, after Los Angeles bought back the civic water system from a group of privateers. Like its top man, William Mulholland, who began as a ditch-digger, the new DWP chief, Marcie Edwards, also started at the bottom, as a clerk. Now she's...

  • U.S. still has time to stake out a position of strength on Ukraine
    U.S. still has time to stake out a position of strength on Ukraine

    American and European stock markets have been jumpy for weeks as they contemplate possible armed conflict between Russia and Ukraine. Inside Ukraine, certainly, Kiev's forces have been pushing back separatists supported by Moscow , and they've been surprisingly successful in the...

Comments
Loading