Opinion
Reading Los Angeles: Join The Times' new book club
Opinion Top of the Ticket

Romney would ground Big Bird but send military spending soaring

Mitt Romney may have won the first presidential debate, but what stuck in many people’s minds was his threat to fire Big Bird. Apparently, Romney thinks America’s debt problem can be fixed by picking up pennies along Sesame Street.

Pressed to explain how he would balance the federal budget while cutting trillions of dollars in taxes, the allegedly masterful debater offered up just two specifics: He would repeal “Obamacare” (even though the Congressional Budget Office says the healthcare act actually reduces deficit spending) and eliminate the federal subsidy to the Public Broadcasting System.

Directly addressing beleaguered debate moderator Jim Lehrer, the former anchor of the PBS "NewsHour," Romney said, “I’m sorry, Jim, I’m going to stop the subsidy to PBS.... I like PBS, I love Big Bird, I actually like you, too, but I’m not going to keep on spending money on things to borrow money from China to pay for.” 

Romney went on to say he would save additional money by tossing popular federal programs back to the states (the same states that do not have enough money to operate the programs they already have) and by making “government more efficient” (the same boilerplate assurance that every candidate for even the lowliest office offers up when he has no real clue how to fix a budget).

So, after many long months of campaigning and promising to cut the deficit while also cutting taxes, the single genuine and specific spending reduction Romney has stipulated is the one one-hundredth of a percent of federal expenditures that helps pay for Big Bird, Downton Abbey and the rest of the PBS lineup. Defenders of PBS were quick to point out that eliminating the federal subsidy for public television would trim an amount equal to just six hours – 360 minutes – of spending at the Pentagon.

It seems as if it would be more effective to leave PBS with its minuscule piece of federal largess and, instead, cut six hours – or maybe 24 or 48 hours – of military spending, right? Apparently not to Romney. Rather than trimming the Defense Department budget, he has proposed a radical spike in defense outlays that would take military spending to the highest level in 60 years.

On Monday, in his foreign policy speech at the Virginia Military Institute, Romney attacked President Obama, saying the U.S. cannot play an effective role in the Middle East “when our defense spending is being arbitrarily and deeply cut.” Since there have been no arbitrary and deep cuts for the military in Obama’s first term, Romney must have been referring to the automatic reductions that could kick in if Congress and the president fail to reach a budget deal by January. Whether or not that happens, it is crazy to suggest the United States does not spend enough money to keep the country safe.

The 10 nations with the biggest defense budgets spend more than $1 trillion a year on military might. Americans shell out 60% of that amount. In other words, the United States spends more than everyone else combined.

If reining in excessive military spending cannot be part of the budget balancing equation, then bulldozing Sesame Street is a pointless exercise that will do exactly nothing to stop American borrowing from China or head off fiscal calamity. Muppet he may be, but Big Bird is more real than Mitt Romney’s fanciful scheme to balance the budget while sending Pentagon spending into the stratosphere.

 

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
  • Obama fans are shocked by Mitt Romney's dominance in debate
    Obama fans are shocked by Mitt Romney's dominance in debate

    I watched the Wednesday night's presidential debate with a group of wine-sipping West Coast Obama fans who were stunned by the way Mitt Romney dominated the stage.

  • Obama and Romney try to hide their presidential debate skills
    Obama and Romney try to hide their presidential debate skills

    The expectations game that has been going on before tonight’s presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney has been hilariously goofy. It is as if each side is trying to pretend their guy just wandered in from a life of solitude in a monastery where talking is not allowed. 

  • Shorter showers? Nine more ways the state has to change its water ways
    Shorter showers? Nine more ways the state has to change its water ways

    Heading into the fourth summer of drought, water agencies are looking for ways to get Californians to conserve at home. Tear out lawns. Install low-flow toilets. Irrigate with gray water. But what should the whole state be doing? Opinion asked nine water experts what needs to change about how California...

  • Evolving awareness is cause for same-sex-marriage optimism in court
    Evolving awareness is cause for same-sex-marriage optimism in court

    On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the Ohio case of Obergefell vs. Hodges, as well as three related cases from Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee. The court is then expected to decide whether the Constitution requires states to grant gay people the same rights in marriage as...

  • The deepest war wound may be the anguish of moral injury
    The deepest war wound may be the anguish of moral injury

    When the Greek playwright Sophocles came home from war, in the 5th century BC, trust and betrayal must have been on his mind. He wrote “Philoctetes,” about a wounded Greek warrior abandoned by Odysseus on the way to Troy.

  • Are we winning the drone war?
    Are we winning the drone war?

    Almost two years ago, President Obama announced that he was tightening the rules under which the CIA carries out drone strikes against suspected terrorists in Pakistan, Yemen and other countries. “Before any strike is taken, there must be a near-certainty that no civilians will be killed or injured...

Comments
Loading