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Watch live: New 'Cosmos' series creators answer your questions

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Anyone want to talk about the Cosmos?

On Tuesday evening, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and the producers of "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey" will answer your questions during a live question and answer session to be broadcast from the Greek Theater in Los Angeles, and you can watch it live, right here.

The live broadcast begins at 6 p.m. PST.

"Cosmos: A SpacetimeOdyssey" premieres at 9 p.m. Sunday on Fox and the National Geographic Channel. It it is an update of Carl Sagan's seminal 1980 PBS series "Cosmos: A Personal Journey."

Sagan's "Cosmos" was an attempt to explain as much as we know about "all that is, or ever was, or ever will be." Armed with a "spaceship of the imagination" he took viewers to the edge of the universe, showed us what it might look like to travel at near the speed of light and helped us conceptualize what a journey to the stars might look like. 

This time around Tyson, the charismatic head of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City, is charged with leading us through the world of scientific discovery.

The previews promise dazzling special effects, and lots of sunglasses, and the early reviews are positive. But those who remember (or have recently watched) the original "Cosmos" series know Sagan is a hard act to follow. 

At the Tuesday evening question and answer session,  Tyson will be joined by some of the series' producers, including Ann Druyan, Sagan's wife, who co-wrote the original "Cosmos" series in 1980, and helped write, direct and produce the 2014 reboot.

Seth MacFarlane, creator of "Family Guy," will be there too. He's the executive producer of the new "Cosmos" and a huge Sagan fan. Without him, this Cosmos redux might never have happened.

Series executive producers Mitchell Cannold ("Dirty Dancing" ) Brannon Braga ("24," "Star Trek") and Jason Clark ("Ted") will be answering questions as well.   

If you have questions, you can either submit them via the series' Facebook page or Twitter using #cosmoslive.

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