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'Friendship Nine's' convictions for lunch counter civil rights sit-in vacated
'Friendship Nine's' convictions for lunch counter civil rights sit-in vacated

The old men walked into the courtroom with halting steps, grayer and a bit slower than when they were young. They had been hauled into a nearby courtroom here 54 years ago this week. That time, a white judge, B. Drennan Hayes, convicted them of trespassing for staging a sit-in at a whites-only lunch counter in this Southern textile town. He gave the nine men a choice: a $100 fine or 30 days on the York County chain gang. They chose the chain gang. So began the civil rights “jail, no bail” movement, which helped galvanize opposition to public segregation in the Jim Crow South. On Wednesday morning, seven of those men faced the judge's nephew, Judge John C. Hayes...

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