Topics

Insurance
Risks of twins, triplets may prompt IVF patients to opt for singletons
Risks of twins, triplets may prompt IVF patients to opt for singletons

A new study bolsters the argument that fertility doctors should transfer just one embryo at a time when they are trying to help women give birth. Data on 233,850 infants born over a 10-year period show that twins, triplets and other “higher order multiples” are more likely to die prematurely and to require costly medical care compared to babies born as singletons. In a study published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, researchers reviewed birth, hospital and death records for infants born in Western Australia between 1993 and 2003, following each child for at least five years. Compared with the infants born solo, twins were 3.4 times more likely to be stillborn and 6.4...

Loading