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After controversial killings, police departments seek 'less lethal' weapons
After controversial killings, police departments seek 'less lethal' weapons

Knees bent and elbows locked, Christian Ellis stood in a swirl of gun smoke, clutching the base of a 9-millimeter Glock 17. It’s the same firearm carried by police officers across the country, but seconds before firing, Ellis pulled out an orange slide and snapped it onto the weapon. A metal sphere now hung in front of the muzzle. When he fired, the bullet buried itself into the sphere, sending it hurtling toward a target downrange. “It knocks the person down. It’s going to break some ribs,” said Ellis, chief executive of Alternative Ballistics, the maker of the device. “It’s going to feel like a professional baseball player swung a hammer and hit...

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