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Study says early DDT exposure may set up females for obesity, diabetes
Study says early DDT exposure may set up females for obesity, diabetes

As they reached adulthood, female mice who were exposed in utero and just after birth to the pesticide DDT showed metabolic changes that put them at greater risk for obesity and type-2 diabetes, a new study says. The metabolic abnormalities seen in the exposed female mice were dramatically exacerbated when they were fed a high-fat diet for 12 weeks in adulthood. Compared with unexposed mice who also ate a high-fat diet, females exposed to DDT around the time of their birth were more likely to develop high cholesterol, insulin insensitivity, glucose intolerance and metabolic problems that could lead to liver disease. The study, published Wednesday in the journal PLoS One, helps explain...

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