Eric Bana

Guy Ritchie's 'King Arthur: Legend of the Sword' is a head-pounding, nothing-sacred origin story

Guy Ritchie's 'King Arthur: Legend of the Sword' is a head-pounding, nothing-sacred origin story

There are some first-rate performances in “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword,” most of them delivered by computer-generated animals.

Eagles swoop down from the sky to fend off hostile armed guards. Venomous snakes swell to Kraken-esque dimensions. Giant elephants stomp into battle and knock down bridges with wrecking balls, which is a pretty good metaphor for director Guy Ritchie’s nothing-sacred approach to Arthurian myth.

Somehow hectic and lumbering, diverting and dispiriting all at once, this mud-toned medieval pulp largely cleaves to the spirit of Ritchie’s “Sherlock Holmes” series, reducing a fabled figure of British lore to two hours of tough-guy swagger and...

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