Politics
Trump wanted to fire women who weren't pretty enough, say employees at his California golf club

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT WATCH

IN CONVERSATION WITH ...

view more

HEALTH

view more

CLIMATE & ENVIRONMENT

view more

The world's fastest animal is in a race for survival in Iran

The three-acre hilltop park overlooking Iran’s smog-blanketed capital might seem like a nice spot for romance. But the couple has not been in the mood. Delbar, a 4-year-old female Asiatic cheetah, was brought to the fenced enclosure at Tehran’s Pardisan park by conservation officials who hoped...

POVERTY & INEQUALITY

view more

MORE GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY NEWS

  • Global refugee crisis overwhelms humanitarian aid system and exacerbates its shortcomings

    Global refugee crisis overwhelms humanitarian aid system and exacerbates its shortcomings

    War, conflict and persecution have forced about 60 million people worldwide to flee their homes, overwhelming the global humanitarian aid system designed to help them and exposing its shortcomings. Haphazard organization, inefficient spending and a lack of coordination in delivering aid are among...

  • South Sudan at age 5: Here's why it's not a happy birthday

    South Sudan at age 5: Here's why it's not a happy birthday

    South Sudan became independent on July 9, 2011. In December 2013, a power struggle within the government led to internal conflict and widespread civilian displacement. The conflict added to an economic crisis linked to the falling price of oil and a drop in exports by pipeline through its former...

  • Yellow fever outbreak in Africa is 'serious,' but not yet a global emergency

    Yellow fever outbreak in Africa is 'serious,' but not yet a global emergency

    Outbreaks of yellow fever in central and southwest Africa have not reached the level of a global emergency, but a stronger response by affected nations and the international community is needed to prevent the spread of the deadly disease, the World Health Organization said Thursday. An expert committee...

  • Millions hooked on illicit drugs, as nations debate policy to tackle the problem

    Millions hooked on illicit drugs, as nations debate policy to tackle the problem

    As leaders from around the world gather in New York for what many are calling the most important summit on illegal drugs in two decades, one thing is clear: The world has a serious drug problem.Worldwide, about 246 million people use illicit drugs, and 1 in 10 of these users suffer from disorders...

  • U.N. to consider significant reforms to international drug policy

    U.N. to consider significant reforms to international drug policy

    At what is being billed as the most significant high-level gathering on global drug policy in two decades, the stage will be set for world leaders to discuss what would have once been unthinkable — reversing course in the war on drugs. The United Nations General Assembly Special Session on the...

  • Global leaders pledge more help for refugees; critics say pledges are not enough

    Global leaders pledge more help for refugees; critics say pledges are not enough

    Global leaders promised Monday to better protect the rights of refugees and migrants, and undertake a more coordinated response to the world’s deepening crisis of displaced people. But human rights and humanitarian groups criticized the agreement for being weak and failing to address the magnitude...

  • Waging war on Islamic State: The first step is to drop hundreds of boxes of leaflets

    Waging war on Islamic State: The first step is to drop hundreds of boxes of leaflets

    The pilots stared ahead at the night sky, their eyes scanning an expanse of black that was interrupted by the glittering outlines of northern Iraq's cities and towns.  On the plane’s port side, a large spiderweb of yellow and neon lights came into view.  “That’s Mosul,” said Col. Thaer Hussein,...

  • The biggest animals in the ocean are more likely to go extinct

    The biggest animals in the ocean are more likely to go extinct

    What happens when you remove all the biggest animals from the ocean? If you could stick around for the next few thousand years, you might find out.   A new study finds that in our modern era, large marine animals are significantly more likely to go extinct than small ones. It’s a disturbing pattern...

  • Why millions of Indian workers just staged one of the biggest labor strikes in history

    Why millions of Indian workers just staged one of the biggest labor strikes in history

    Earlier this month, tens of millions of Indian workers staged a one-day general strike that unions billed as the biggest work stoppage in human history. By the unions’ count, 180 million workers stayed home to demand a slew of changes to labor laws, including establishing a $270 monthly minimum...

  • Cease-fire begins in war-torn Syria, but civilians and officials worry about violations

    Cease-fire begins in war-torn Syria, but civilians and officials worry about violations

    A cease-fire in Syria’s civil war got off to a shaky start Monday as the government and rebels accused each other of violations and the U.S. and Russia, which brokered the agreement, failed to clarify who was to blame. Secretary of State John F. Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov...

  • South Sudan's leaders got rich off war as their people suffered, report finds

    South Sudan's leaders got rich off war as their people suffered, report finds

    It pays to commit war crimes, according to a report by an investigative group co-founded by actor George Clooney that spent two years scrutinizing the world’s newest country, South Sudan. On the surface, the country’s brutal 2013 civil war was fought over ethnic divides. It grew out of a conflict...

  • Bombed and beleaguered, a Baghdad neighborhood takes stock on a key Muslim holiday

    Bombed and beleaguered, a Baghdad neighborhood takes stock on a key Muslim holiday

    Kathem Hussein fondly remembers the year that he made more than $4,000 on the Day of Arafah, the holiest day on the Muslim calendar. This year, Hussein, a street vendor of men’s shoes, expected no such windfall. “We’ve had some customers, some signs of life, but nothing like we should be having,”...

  • Rising homelessness and lack of psychiatric care beds are cited in surge of mental competency cases

    Rising homelessness and lack of psychiatric care beds are cited in surge of mental competency cases

    A lack of psychiatric care beds and rising homelessness are fueling a dramatic increase in mental competency cases in Los Angeles County, a new study has found. The county launched a review after The Times reported on a surge in the number of competency cases in Los Angeles’ mental health court over...

  • Airbnb tries to fight racism with rule changes

    Airbnb tries to fight racism with rule changes

    Accused of doing too little to thwart discrimination on its short-term home rental platform, Airbnb announced policy changes Thursday that are intended to educate and punish hosts who don’t follow its rules and protect guests.  In a 32-page report written by former American Civil Liberties Union...

  • Hanging on in Navajo Nation: First the water turned orange, then the air went bad

    Hanging on in Navajo Nation: First the water turned orange, then the air went bad

    A year ago, the people of Shiprock watched their crops shrivel as a week without water stretched into a month, and then a whole lost season. Bertha Etsitty’s watermelon vines curled and stiffened, even as her grandchildren emptied their water bottles on the leaves in a failed bid to keep the patch...

  • Nearly 50 million children uprooted: A global crisis by the numbers

    Nearly 50 million children uprooted: A global crisis by the numbers

    The haunting images of Syrian toddler Aylan Kurdi’s body washed up on a Turkish beach, and of Omran Daqneesh’s bloodied and bewildered face after his home was destroyed in Aleppo, have become emblems of the heavy toll inflicted by war and displacement on the world’s children. But the sheer magnitude...

  • This town in South Sudan has no name. It was never supposed to exist. Now 21,000 people live there

    This town in South Sudan has no name. It was never supposed to exist. Now 21,000 people live there

    It is a throbbing, jostling town with no name. Wander down the dirt street, and you’ll see a hubbub of boys playing ball, women selling small bags of sugar or charcoal, children selling plastic bottles of milk and cooks dropping dough balls into hot oil. There are dogs on every corner, and hardware...

  • Robotic babies intended to reduce teen pregnancies may have had the opposite effect

    Robotic babies intended to reduce teen pregnancies may have had the opposite effect

    Sex education can be a fraught chapter in a young person's life. It usually involves clinical diagrams, uncomfortable discussions and possibly the unforgettable experience of watching your gym teacher stretch a condom over a banana. In some parts of the world, schools have kicked it up a notch by...

  • Meet the pangolin, the most poached mammal in the world

    Meet the pangolin, the most poached mammal in the world

    As the congress of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources gets underway Thursday in Hawaii, environmental policymakers and conservation experts will discuss managing the environment, protecting wildlife and how best to chart the direction of conservation efforts....

  • China once struggled to feed its people. Now it's seeing a rise in eating disorders

    China once struggled to feed its people. Now it's seeing a rise in eating disorders

    The patients filed into a drab, gray-paneled room, clothes hanging from skeletal frames. One young woman held a plastic bag of cookies. Visitors looked up at the hospital’s faded Chinese New Year decorations and pretended not to notice their entrance. A mother stood in front of the packed room...

  • 'We thought things would get better': A year after the nuclear deal, Iranians await economic recovery

    'We thought things would get better': A year after the nuclear deal, Iranians await economic recovery

    Eight months after international sanctions were lifted in exchange for curbs on its nuclear program, Iran’s long-suffering people are still waiting for change. President Hassan Rouhani’s promises of new jobs and greater incomes haven’t been met. Foreign investment has been slow to materialize....

  • To understand life in rural South Sudan, talk to this man about his cattle

    To understand life in rural South Sudan, talk to this man about his cattle

    The possessions in Luko Loku’s thatched home convey his simple life. A bedside stool with a sliver of mirror. An old door hinge. A machete lying on the bed frame, as if sleeping. His clothes dangle from a wire, his motorcycle leans against one wall. There’s a hammer, a scattering of plastic cups,...

  • More companies commit to equal pay pledge on Women’s Equality Day

    More companies commit to equal pay pledge on Women’s Equality Day

    Facebook, Apple, and CVS are among 29 companies that on Friday promised to work toward erasing the gender pay gap by signing onto the White House’s Equal Pay Pledge, the Obama administration announced Friday. With the new commitments, more than 50 companies employing millions of people have signed...

74°