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Life on Guam | Living in North Korea’s crosshairs

When the North Korean regime of Kim Jong Un threatened to fire a nuclear weapon toward the U.S. territory of Guam, President Trump predicted that the added attention from the threat would increase tourism to the tiny island in the Pacific Ocean.

And some tourism officials agree. But they don’t think the increase will be substantial.

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(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Customers walk by a neon sign at Hard Rock Cafe in Tamuning, Guam.

(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Demonstrators hold signs during a People for Peace Rally at the Chief Quipuha Statue in Hagatna, Guam.

(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Protesters flash the peace sign during the People for Peace Rally held after the heated exchanges between the U.S. and North Korea.

(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

A young protester holds a sign during a People for Peace Rally in Guam, which is home to about 7,000 American troops and 160,000 residents.

(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

A runner jogs beside Agana Bay in Asan, Guam.

(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Tourists prepare to snorkel in Tumon Bay in Tamuning, Guam.

(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Tourists watch the sunset from Gun Beach in Tamuning.

(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Tourists pull their luggage along Pale San Vitores Road in Tamuning. The American territory of Guam remains on high alert as a showdown between the U.S. and North Korea continues.

(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Tourists board a shuttle bus in Tamuning.

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