WorldWorld Now

Briton slain in Libya is identified as power engineer

CrimeCrime, Law and JusticeShootingsScienceTripoli (Libya)New Zealand

LONDON -- A British power engineer found shot to death in Libya this week was officially identified Saturday.

The British Foreign Office released a statement on behalf of his family identifying the victim as Mark De Salis. He had been working for the last six years as a power manager for First Engineering, a Britain-based company bringing generators to Tripoli to provide electricity.

The statement said the family was “shocked and devastated to hear about Mark’s death .... Mark enjoyed his work in Tripoli and like the Libyan people. Mark enjoyed traveling and had traveled extensively. He was a decent and incredibly loyal man and he was loved by many. He will be sadly missed by his family and friends. ”

De Salis’ body was found Thursday close to that of a New Zealand woman who had also been shot. She has not been identified but was described in the statement by De Salis' family as “a close friend from New Zealand who was also killed, and our thoughts are with her family at this sad time.”

The couple were found lying in the sand near Mellitah, a coastal town about 60 miles west of Tripoli, the capital. There is a large power complex partly owned by the Italian engineering company ENI in the area.

According to a report in the Guardian, the couple’s luggage and a Toyota car parked nearby had not been touched.

A British Foreign Office statement posted Friday appealed to Libyan authorities for cooperation.

“Our chargé d’affaires has raised the shooting with the Libyan authorities and we are liaising closely with them on follow-up,” the statement said. “We call upon the Libyan government to carry out a thorough investigation into this tragic incident and to continue to do all it can to bring to justice the perpetrators of this appalling crime, as it strives to build strong rule of law in Libya.”

Initial news reports had identified both victims as teachers. Ronnie Smith, an American teaching in Benghazi, was shot and killed there a month ago while running.

Stobart is a news assistant in the Times' London bureau.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
CrimeCrime, Law and JusticeShootingsScienceTripoli (Libya)New Zealand
  • Obama stays low-key on Ukraine, waits for Europe to take bigger role
    Obama stays low-key on Ukraine, waits for Europe to take bigger role

    In the week since the downing of a Malaysia Airlines passenger jet snapped the world’s attention onto the war in Ukraine, President Obama has made three statements, called several world leaders, identified the parties responsible and repeatedly expressed moral outrage.

  • Kerry arrives in Israel to push for Gaza cease-fire
    Kerry arrives in Israel to push for Gaza cease-fire

    Following talks in Cairo, U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry landed in Tel Aviv on Wednesday for meetings with Israeli and Palestinian leaders in an effort to bring an end to days of bitter fighting between Israel and Gaza militants.

  • Two Ukraine military jets shot down, officials say
    Two Ukraine military jets shot down, officials say

    Ukrainian officials said Wednesday that two military planes have been shot down in the eastern part of the country, where the government is waging a battle against pro-Russia separatists.

  • Bodies of Malaysia jet victims leave for Netherlands
    Bodies of Malaysia jet victims leave for Netherlands

    The first bodies of victims from the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash began their journey from Ukraine to the Netherlands, as 16 coffins were loaded into a Dutch military plane during a solemn ceremony in the northeast Ukrainian city of Kharkiv on Wednesday morning.

  • Suicide bombing kills at least 26 in Baghdad

    A car bomb ripped through a Baghdad neighborhood late Tuesday, killing at least 26 people and wounding 33 in the latest in a series of attacks targeting mostly Shiite Muslim districts in the Iraqi capital, according to local media reports Wednesday.

  • John Kerry flies to Tel Aviv despite FAA ban
    John Kerry flies to Tel Aviv despite FAA ban

    The top U.S. diplomat defied a Federal Aviation Administration ban and flew into Israel's main airport Wednesday in a sign of sheer will to achieve a cease-fire agreement in the warring Gaza Strip despite little evidence of progress in ongoing negotiations.

Comments
Loading