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Looking for new museums to explore? Here are five worth a visit

Looking for new museums to explore? Here are five worth a visit
The V&A Dundee, designed by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, will open September in Scotland. (Ross Fraser McLean)

There are at least 55,000 museums in the world, according to the International Council of Museums. New ones are set to open this year, among them a spinoff of London's venerable V&A and a new home for Seattle's shrine to all things Nordic.

Scotland

London's V&A Museum, once called the Victoria and Albert, traces its roots back to 1851. This year, V&A Dundee will open Sept. 15 on the east coast of Scotland as the first satellite museum to bear the name. The remarkable building made with more than 2,000 cast-stone panels looks like a stylized ship floating on the River Tay. Scottish design — architecture, ceramics, jewelry, textiles and more — will be the focus. The opening show is "Ocean Liners: Speed and Style."

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Info: V&A Dundee, 3 Greenmarket, Dundee, Scotland

Seattle

An artist's rendering of the outside of Seattle's new Nordic Museum.
An artist's rendering of the outside of Seattle's new Nordic Museum. (Design by Mithun, Image by Mir. Courtesy Nordic Museum)

As the V&A Dundee's building tips its hat to shipbuilding, the new Nordic Museum in Seattle will open its new home May 5 with galleries organized around an interior fjord "composed of faceted white planes evoking its glacial origins," the website says. The museum is moving from a cramped 1907 building to a 57,000-square-foot site in the city's Ballard section. Displays will tell the story of Nordic and Nordic American culture and history. Expect to see historic wooden longboats, traditional clothing and fishing hooks among the thousands of items in the collection.

Info: Nordic Museum, 2655 NW Market St., Seattle

Charleston

The Fireproof Building in Charleston, S.C., will house a new local historical society museum.
The Fireproof Building in Charleston, S.C., will house a new local historical society museum. (South Carolina Historical Society)

Travelers consistently pick Charleston, S.C., as one of the nation's best cities to visit. The town will open a new museum September in the Fireproof Building, a National Historic Landmark that's also home to the South Carolina Historical Society. The Greek Doric-style building got its name for being "the most fire-protected building at the time of its construction in 1827," according to the National Park Service's website. The museum will showcase the state's 300-year heritage and culture in a fresh way: through the eyes of historical characters, from the colonial novel "Cassique of Kiawah" to plantation life and slavery and beyond.

Info: South Carolina Historical Society Museum, 100 Meeting St., Charleston

Egypt

Egyptians celebrate as the giant granite statue of the ancient Pharaoh Ramses II is loaded onto a truck and transferred to its permanent home at the atrium of the Grand Egyptian Museum near Giza, Egypt.
Egyptians celebrate as the giant granite statue of the ancient Pharaoh Ramses II is loaded onto a truck and transferred to its permanent home at the atrium of the Grand Egyptian Museum near Giza, Egypt. (Khaled Elfiqi / EPA-iEFE / REX / Shutterstock)

The partially opened Grand Egyptian Museum near Giza welcomed one of its first bigwigs into the building. In January, an ancient statue of famed pharaoh Ramses II, weighing around 83 tons, was moved from a temporary building into the new museum while a band played and crowds gathered. The building, still under construction, features a facade of pyramids and is close to the real pyramids. When completed, it will be the the permanent home of King Tut and other royal mummies plus around 100,000 of the country's ancient treasures.

Tokyo

An artwork called "Pumpkins Screaming About Love Beyond Infinity" at the Yayoi Kusama Museum in Tokyo.
An artwork called "Pumpkins Screaming About Love Beyond Infinity" at the Yayoi Kusama Museum in Tokyo. (Yayoi Kusama Museum)

Artist Yayoi Kusama wowed Angelenos last fall with her infinite and Instagrammable mirrored rooms at the Broad Museum, a show making its way around America. Now the 88-year-old, known for her repetitive patterns of polka dots and pumpkins as well as images derived from her fantasies, has a museum that bears her name. A show opening Feb. 28 called "Here, Now, I have Reached the Grandest Start of My Life" will display her early works from the 1950s. The building, which resembles stacked cubes, is run by Kusama's foundation. Tickets must be purchased online and in advance.

Info: Yayoi Kusama Museum, 107 Bentencho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo

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