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Report: Mathematicians have the best jobs, lumberjacks have the worst

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Job hunters on the prowl for a career change might want to brush up on their math skills: Mathematicians have the best jobs in 2014, one report said.

Those who calculate theorems and deal with numbers all day are well compensated and their entire profession is poised for growth, according to the annual ranking from jobs site CareerCast.

The worst jobs in America tend to include some element of danger or instability, such as newspaper reporters, enlisted military personnel and taxi drivers.

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That is certainly true for the worst job on the list -- lumberjack.

Loggers have to deal with dangerous working conditions, low pay and a dwindling number of available positions as technology eliminates jobs.

CareerCast ranked 200 professions by considering factors such as work environment, income, stress levels, market outlook and physical demands: Are there persistent chances of getting injured? What is the outlook for growth? Does the work require frequent travel and tight deadlines?

Picking the right career is crucial not only for money but also general happiness: The average American worker spends more than two-thirds of his or her day at work or completing job-related tasks, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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Many of the best jobs, unsurprisingly, require high levels of education often in the areas of science and math.

After mathematicians, the next five best jobs: tenured college professor, statistician, actuary and audiologist (otherwise known as people who help fix hearing and balance problems).

The report noted that cultural shifts have a big influence on the job-market. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act, combined with aging baby boomers, have bolstered jobs in healthcare.

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Follow Shan Li on Twitter @ShanLi

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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