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New releases: 'Jimmy P.' from Arnaud Desplechin

EntertainmentMoviesTelevision IndustryFilm FestivalsArnaud DesplechinBenicio Del ToroMathieu Amalric

Jimmy P.

Available on VOD beginning Feb. 20

French filmmaker Arnaud Desplechin is responsible for some of the most audacious and entertaining films in world cinema today: movies such as "Kings and Queen" and "A Christmas Tale," which take offbeat approaches to relatable family dramas. Desplechin's "Jimmy P." drew mixed reviews when it debuted at the Cannes Film Festival last year, perhaps because it doesn't resemble the sprawling, experimental work he's best known for. It's rather a quiet, direct and talky film, with Benicio Del Toro playing a Blackfoot Indian and World War II veteran being treated by an anthropologist-therapist played by Desplechin regular Mathieu Amalric. Through a series of conversations, the Native American's troubles are revealed to have as much to do with the systemic mistreatment of his people as they do with the war. Some patience for scenes of people sitting around and gabbing is required, but for those willing to put in the time, "Jimmy P." has a unique perspective worth exploring. 

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Fantastic Mr. Fox

Criterion Blu-ray, $39.95

The Criterion Collection's long, fruitful association with director Wes Anderson continues as Criterion adds his stop-motion-animation charmer. Based on the Roald Dahl book of the same name, Anderson's film features the voice talent of George Clooney, Meryl Streep and Anderson regulars Jason Schwartzman and Bill Murray, all of whom deliver their lines in a low-key, naturalistic way that plays hilariously against the elaborate caper plot and Anderson's fussily decorated animal kingdom. Criterion's DVD/Blu-ray set includes a commentary track, a documentary about Dahl and revelatory behind-the-scenes footage. 

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Game of Thrones: The Complete Third Season

HBO, $59.99; Blu-ray, $79.98/$129.97

The second season of the HBO hit mostly moved the fantasy-drama's characters into position for what transpires in the thrilling Season 3: a series of small skirmishes across many lands, culminating in pitiless bloodletting. The series' genius always has been that this show with swordplay, magic and dragons plays out with a Shakespearean sophistication, featuring great acting, memorable dialogue and startling scenes. With the third season, "Game of Thrones" also showed that it's not going to follow the episodic conventions of most television. This is a true saga, with real stakes. The DVD and Blu-ray sets supplement the season's 10 episodes with commentary tracks, extra scenes and in-depth featurettes. 

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Romeo & Juliet

Available on VOD beginning Tuesday

William Shakespeare's romantic tragedy has been filmed so many times and so many ways that any new production needs to be either great enough or unusual enough to supplant the many fine versions already out there. Last year's "Romeo & Juliet" — produced and written by "Downton Abbey" creator Julian Fellowes — isn't weird, and it's certainly not great, or even all that good. Fellowes retains the story of star-crossed lovers from rival families, but he scraps the dialogue, making the movie into more of a mundane historical romance. Director Carlo Carlei is no help, stranding stars Douglas Booth and Hailee Steinfeld in what amounts to a tedious teen soap. The DVD and Blu-ray add featurettes.

And… 

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Afternoon Delight

Cinedigm, $29.95; Blu-ray, $34.95

The Cinema of Jean Rollin: The Vampire Collection

Kino Redemption, $59.95; Blu-ray, $89.95

Darkman

Scream! Factory Blu-ray, $29.93

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EntertainmentMoviesTelevision IndustryFilm FestivalsArnaud DesplechinBenicio Del ToroMathieu Amalric
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