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Los Angeles Times

Deborah Netburn

Writer

Deborah Netburn is a science reporter for the Los Angeles Times. She began her journalism career at the New York Observer in 1999, and has covered residential real estate, rich kids in Manhattan, entertainment, home and garden, national news, and technology. She has worked at the Los Angeles Times since 2006.

Recent Articles

  • Astronomical sleuth reveals the timing of the iconic 1945 'Kiss'

    Astronomical sleuth reveals the timing of the iconic 1945 'Kiss'

    It's an iconic image: A sailor kisses a nurse in Times Square after hearing the news that World War II was officially over — just after 7 p.m. on August 14, 1945. Or maybe not. Some skeptics are now challenging that widely accepted story. In their version of events, the famous kiss captured by...

  • Giant sinkholes spotted on Rosetta's comet

    Giant sinkholes spotted on Rosetta's comet

    Giant pits nearly 600 feet deep on the surface of Rosetta's comet are likely caused by massive sinkholes, scientists say. In a paper published in the journal Nature, researchers describe 18 mysterious depressions on the speeding comet that they say could only occur by sinkhole collapse.  On average,...

  • 'Leap second': Why June 30 will have one extra second

    'Leap second': Why June 30 will have one extra second

    On June 30, the world will receive a gift of time: a single, extra second known as a "leap second." At that moment, the official atomic clocks that keep Universal Coordinated Time will mark the time as 23h 59m 59s, followed by the leap second 23h 59m 60s. July 1 will continue as usual, beginning...

  • New firefly found in SoCal -- Wait, we have fireflies?

    New firefly found in SoCal -- Wait, we have fireflies?

    A never-before-seen species of firefly was just discovered in the Santa Monica mountains, in Topanga. It's just a little guy — about half a centimeter long. It does glow, but faintly. Experts say it has nothing on its beaming East Coast cousins that light up lawns on warm summer evenings. But the...

  • Squatting in skinny jeans can lead to nerve damage, study finds

    Squatting in skinny jeans can lead to nerve damage, study finds

    Fashionistas beware: A new case study suggests that squatting in skinny jeans can lead to serious nerve damage in your lower legs. In a report in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, a team of doctors relay the cautionary tale of a 35-year-old woman who wound up lying prone on...

  • Why conservatives might be better at dieting than liberals

    Why conservatives might be better at dieting than liberals

    Are conservatives more likely to stick to a diet than liberals? The answer might be yes. In a paper published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers say there is a link between political ideology and the ability to exert self-control. In a series of three studies...

  • Most kangaroos are lefties, study finds

    Most kangaroos are lefties, study finds

    The question of whether you are a righty or a lefty no longer applies just to humans and great apes. It turns out that kangaroos prefer one hand over the other as well.  Most kangaroos prefer to use their left hand to pick up leaves, move food into their mouths, and groom their bodies, according...

  • Meteor showers bring dust clouds on the moon

    Meteor showers bring dust clouds on the moon

    Scientists say vast clouds are floating above the lunar surface, and they grow each time there is a meteor shower on Earth. These towering clouds are made of tiny particles of moon and space dust, and they do not look like clouds on Earth. In fact, researchers say they are not visible to the human...

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