Deborah Netburn

Writer

Deborah Netburn is a science reporter for the Los Angeles Times. She began her journalism career at the New York Observer in 1999, and has covered residential real estate, rich kids in Manhattan, entertainment, home and garden, national news, and technology. She has worked at the Los Angeles Times since 2006.

Recent Articles

  • British scientists are freaking out about 'Brexit' too

    British scientists are freaking out about 'Brexit' too

    Brexit updates: What’s happening now that Britain voted to leave the EU June 28, 2016, 8:27 a.m. Britons voted Thursday to leave the 28-nation European Union, a stunning decision that appeared to defy economic reason and cast doubts over the future of the bloc that been a bulwark for peace and...

  • British scientists are freaking out about 'Brexit' too

    British scientists are freaking out about 'Brexit' too

    Britain’s decision to exit the European Union has affected all aspects of British society – even science.  On Friday, the Royal Astronomical Society, which works to advance science research, took a break from promoting new findings in astronomy and geophysics to weigh in on the results of the referendum....

  • The science behind this crazy heat wave

    The science behind this crazy heat wave

    The sidewalks are scalding. The sun is blinding. It’s over 100 degrees across much of Los Angeles. We’re in the midst of a bona fide heat wave and it’s only June. What the heck is going on? “Things are definitely out of whack here,” said Bill Patzert, a climatologist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory....

  • Light pollution prevents 1 in 3 Earthlings from seeing the Milky Way at night

    Light pollution prevents 1 in 3 Earthlings from seeing the Milky Way at night

    Across the globe, light pollution is making the night sky lighter and the stars harder to see, according to a new study. In a paper published Friday in Science Advances, researchers reveal that 1 in 3 people worldwide are unable to see the Milky Way when they gaze at the heavens in their hometown. ...

  • Bioluminescence is so useful to fish that it evolved 27 times, study says

    Bioluminescence is so useful to fish that it evolved 27 times, study says

    We don’t often encounter species that produce their own light here on land. Fireflies do it. Some millipedes and fungi do it. That’s about it. But in the murky depths of the ocean, it’s a whole different glowing story. About 1,000 to 1,500 feet beneath the ocean surface, in a region known as the...

  • New fossil find in Indonesia could represent the ancestors of the mysterious 'Hobbit' species

    New fossil find in Indonesia could represent the ancestors of the mysterious 'Hobbit' species

    Buried 6½ feet beneath volcanic rock on the Indonesian island of Flores, scientists have found the fossilized remains of a petite hominin that lived 700,000 years ago. The discovery, described Wednesday in two papers in Nature, consists of just six tiny teeth and a fragment of a small lower jawbone....

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