Nation

Guard intelligence analyst held on $1-million bond in bomb case

FirearmsNew Year's DayBureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

WASHINGTON — A man arrested for speeding in Ohio on New Year's Day was traveling with several dozen explosives, a detonator and four firearms, and was carrying schematic drawings of a military training facility, authorities said Wednesday.

Officials said the suspect, Andrew Scott Boguslawski, of Moores Hill, Ind., was trained as an intelligence analyst with the Indiana National Guard and held a security clearance.

Boguslawski, 43, was detained on a $1-million bond after prosecutors in Madison County, Ohio, said he carried bomb-making tools along with 48 explosives, two rifles and two handguns.

"Most concerning to me was that they found a remote detonating device," said Nick Adkins, an assistant Madison County prosecutor. "The majority of the devices, I would not classify as high-tech, but some of the devices were set up to be activated with the remote detonator."

Boguslawski has not given police any statements since his arrest, officials said. He is due to appear in court Friday in London, Ohio, on a felony charge of illegally making or possessing explosives. Court records do not list a defense attorney.

"It's an ongoing investigation, and we are trying to get to the bottom of whatever was going on with him," agent David Coulson of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said Wednesday. "That is why there's a $1-million bond."

Indiana National Guard Lt. Col. Cathleen A. Van Bree said Boguslawski joined the Guard in Pennsylvania after he graduated from high school there in 1988. He also served in the Guard in Ohio and Tennessee, she said.

After transferring to the Indiana National Guard in November 2007, he was employed as a groundskeeper at the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center. He was later trained in military intelligence analysis. In November, he was assigned to the Guard's medical discharge unit.

richard.serrano@latimes.com

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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FirearmsNew Year's DayBureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
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