Can Trump put another Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court?

During his campaign, Donald Trump listed potential Supreme Court nominees. Here's a rundown of how the process will work.

President-elect Donald Trump will soon have the chance to make good on one of his most consequential campaign promises: fill the Supreme Court vacancy with a judge in the mold of conservative icon Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February.

President-elect Donald Trump will soon have the chance to make good on one of his most consequential campaign promises: fill the Supreme Court vacancy with a judge in the mold of conservative icon Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February.

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President-elect Donald Trump will soon have the chance to make good on one of his most consequential campaign promises: fill the Supreme Court vacancy with a judge in the mold of conservative icon Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February.

President-elect Donald Trump will soon have the chance to make good on one of his most consequential campaign promises: fill the Supreme Court vacancy with a judge in the mold of conservative icon Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February.

President-elect Donald Trump will soon have the chance to make good on one of his most consequential campaign promises: fill the Supreme Court vacancy with a judge in the mold of conservative icon Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February.

President-elect Donald Trump will soon have the chance to make good on one of his most consequential campaign promises: fill the Supreme Court vacancy with a judge in the mold of conservative icon Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February.

President-elect Donald Trump will soon have the chance to make good on one of his most consequential campaign promises: fill the Supreme Court vacancy with a judge in the mold of conservative icon Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February.

Sykes has ruled in favor of religious employers who challenged President Obama’s healthcare law and its requirement to provide free contraceptives, and she voted to uphold Wisconsin’s voter ID law. But she has not taken sharply ideological stands or called for overturning liberal precedents.

Sykes has ruled in favor of religious employers who challenged President Obama’s healthcare law and its requirement to provide free contraceptives, and she voted to uphold Wisconsin’s voter ID law. But she has not taken sharply ideological stands or called for overturning liberal precedents.

Sykes has ruled in favor of religious employers who challenged President Obama’s healthcare law and its requirement to provide free contraceptives, and she voted to uphold Wisconsin’s voter ID law. But she has not taken sharply ideological stands or called for overturning liberal precedents.

Sykes has ruled in favor of religious employers who challenged President Obama’s healthcare law and its requirement to provide free contraceptives, and she voted to uphold Wisconsin’s voter ID law. But she has not taken sharply ideological stands or called for overturning liberal precedents.

Sykes has ruled in favor of religious employers who challenged President Obama’s healthcare law and its requirement to provide free contraceptives, and she voted to uphold Wisconsin’s voter ID law. But she has not taken sharply ideological stands or called for overturning liberal precedents.

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It remains unclear whether Republicans will agree on changing the rules to allow confirmations with just 50 votes. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) has said he would oppose abandoning the filibuster rule, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has also been seen as resistant to changing long-standing Senate practices.

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It remains unclear whether Republicans will agree on changing the rules to allow confirmations with just 50 votes. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) has said he would oppose abandoning the filibuster rule, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has also been seen as resistant to changing long-standing Senate practices.

It remains unclear whether Republicans will agree on changing the rules to allow confirmations with just 50 votes. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) has said he would oppose abandoning the filibuster rule, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has also been seen as resistant to changing long-standing Senate practices.

It remains unclear whether Republicans will agree on changing the rules to allow confirmations with just 50 votes. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) has said he would oppose abandoning the filibuster rule, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has also been seen as resistant to changing long-standing Senate practices.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

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No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

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No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

No one on the right worries that Pryor would move to the center or the left if he were appointed to the high court.  He is also a protégé of Jeff Sessions, the Alabama senator who is slated to become Trump’s U.S. attorney general.

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