Opinion
Readers React

What a walk can do for your mind

According to your interesting report, a series of studies found that walking can promote creativity and problem-solving ("In a creative slump? Take a walk," April 26). The article suggests that the reasons for this are puzzling.

I suggest that anyone interested look over the mood research work of my colleague at Cal State Long Beach, psychology professor Robert E. Thayer. He published a paper in 1978 and a series of three books that clearly demonstrate that a "brisk 10-minute walk" dramatically modifies mood from tiredness to energy and from tension to calmness.

Moreover, Thayer's research demonstrates that "calm energy" is significantly associated with creativity.

Martin Fiebert

Seal Beach

For 15 years I had the opportunity to walk four miles daily in the hills behind my home in Porter Ranch.

I explained to people that on the rare occasion I was unable to take my walk, I missed it more for mental reasons than for physical ones. Not only would I be more prepared for the day, but when I had difficult personal or business decisions to make, the solution would come to me while walking.

Now that I have retired to south Orange County, I continue to walk every day. I am so glad to keep reading The Times, if not just to verify what I have known for years.

Ed Sinderman

Laguna Woods

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
Comments
Loading